“wildfashion.ro”

In eastern Indonesia, both the production and use of traditional textiles have been transformed as the production, use and value associated with textiles have changed due to modernization. In the past, women produced the textiles either for home consumption or to trade with others. Today, this has changed as most textiles are not being produced at home. Western goods are considered modern and are valued more than traditional goods, including the sarong, which retain a lingering association with colonialism. Now, sarongs are used only for rituals and ceremonial occasions, whereas western clothes are worn to church or government offices. Civil servants working in urban areas are more likely than peasants to make the distinction between western and traditional clothes. Following Indonesia’s independence from the Dutch, people increasingly started buying factory made shirts and sarongs. In textile-producing areas the growing of cotton and production of naturally colored thread became obsolete. Traditional motifs on textiles are no longer considered the property of a certain social class or age group. Wives of government officials are promoting the use of traditional textiles in the form of western garments such as skirts, vests and blouses. This trend is also being followed by the general populace, and whoever can afford to hire a tailor is doing so to stitch traditional ikat textiles into western clothes. Thus, traditional textiles are now fashion goods and are no longer confined to the black, white and brown colour palette but come in array of colours. Traditional textiles are also being used in interior decorations and to make handbags, wallets and other accessories, which are considered fashionable by civil servants and their families. There is also a booming tourist trade in the eastern Indonesian city of Kupang where international as well as domestic tourists are eager to purchase traditionally printed western goods.[60]
“Nick Grimshaw can ‘rock up’ whatever he wears. Whether it is a slim-fitting two-button suit or a biker jacket with a shirt, Nick twists it to his personality.” James Sleaford, Fashion Director, GQ France
Building brand awareness and credibility is a key implication of good public relations. In some cases, great hype is built about new designers’ collections before they are released into the market, due to the immense exposure generated by practitioners.[50] Social media, such as blogs, micro blogs, podcasts, photo and video sharing sites have all become increasingly important to fashion public relations.[51] The interactive nature of these platforms allows practitioners to engage and communicate with publics in real time, and tailor their clients’ brand or campaign messages to the target audience. With blogging platforms such as Instagram, Tumblr, WordPress, and other sharing sites, bloggers have emerged as expert fashion commentators, shaping brands and having a great impact on what is ‘on trend’.[52] Women in the fashion public relations industry such as Sweaty Betty PR founder Roxy Jacenko and Oscar de la Renta’s PR girl Erika Bearman, have acquired copious on their social media sites, by providing a brand identity and a behind the scenes look into the companies they work for.
FashionGo.net® provides retailers access to a vast array of wholesale fashion merchandise at their fingertips 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with just the click of a mouse. With a membership that is free to buyers, FashionGo.net® retailers around the world can efficiently shop, compare, and purchase from a host of vendors at the best prices. FashionGo.net® provides manufacturers and wholesalers a simple, cost effective way to increase sales and expand their businesses on a global e-commerce platform. Businesses based on e-commerce are growing at a rate 7 to 8 times faster than traditional B2B businesses. By becoming a member of FashionGo.net®, manufacturers and wholesalers are able to reach a global customer base with which to augment sales and expand their market without limits.
…because it’s officially that time of year again, Valentine’s Day. Didn’t we just get over Christmas?!  What can you really get the man who has everything, yet uses none of it?  Him.  He’s the best.  We’ve rounded up some of the coolest gifts and ideas for your best bud…or the man.  From dad to son or husband to […]
I took my son to Paris Fashion Week, and all I got was a profound understanding of who he is, what he wants to do with his life, and how it feels to watch a grown man stride down a runway wearing shaggy yellow Muppet pants.
Perhaps it’s not so much nostalgia as an attempt to halt time, to preserve our children’s childhood in an aspic of handstitched jumpers and T-bar shoes. In the UK in 2015 every child is royal, dressed just so and perched atop a throne concocted from its parents’ golden aspirations. “Here is the receptor of our dreams,” we cry in a manner that would make our ancestors weep for not having lived in an era when all anyone has to worry about is the provenance of their offspring’s PJs.
Ms. Riley said, “Children have big tummies and stand in funny ways.” Although she has made one or two concessions to popular tastes, like making her ballet flats in nail-varnish colors, she remains fixed in her view that children should be children and not little brand ambassadors or, in the current parlance, “prostitots.” She said: “I can’t bear advertising on children. And why would a child need to have anything remotely sexy? To me, it’s unethical.”
The notion of global fashion industry is a product of the modern age.Actually this industry is globalised before the age of silk route between India and China [24] Prior to the mid-19th century, most clothing was custom-made. It was handmade for individuals, either as home production or on order from dressmakers and tailors. By the beginning of the 20th century—with the rise of new technologies such as the sewing machine, the rise of global capitalism and the development of the factory system of production, and the proliferation of retail outlets such as department stores—clothing had increasingly come to be mass-produced in standard sizes and sold at fixed prices.
The boys’ dress was modeled to resemble their fathers attire. They would wear shirts and a fitted jacked (a doublet). They also wore close fitting hoses (similar to tights), which were tied by lace, and breeches over all layers. 

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