“how fashion repeats itself”

First look: LANVIN Tulle dress, $1,200, and taffeta coat, $1,570, both at Barneys. Rachel Riley ballet flats, $190. Second look: BURBERRY Trench coat, $375 at Bergdorf Goodman; kilt, $180 at Bloomingdale’s. Converse sneakers, $32. Credit Lee Clower for The New York Times; photographed at shootdigital
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The default answer to this no-win fashion conundrum, for an alarming amount of working women, is to buy their wardrobes at Ann Taylor; a label so ubiquitous in D.C. it might as well be tattooed on the C7 vertebrae of every woman under 60. The line has always offered tasteful middle-management office classics in wool with just enough spandex to vaguely suggest a Sarah Palin strip-o-gram. My shorthand for the look was always “capitalist burqa” or “corporate office submissive”: cubicle-wear of so-so quality for the single girl in her late twenties whose self-esteem has been almost beaten to death by the beauty-industrial complex, and whose decent education has been punished with a thanklessly demanding office job. She’s a can-do Cinderella who has always had to change the oil in her own pumpkin and is too overworked to have a healthy social life outside the workplace. Her outfits must therefore be corporate-respectable, yet body-conscious enough to attract a nice tax-attorney husband.
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There is a type of design called “kutch” design originated from the German word “kitschig” meaning “ugly” or “not aesthetically pleasing.” Kitsch can also refer to “wearing or displaying something that is therefore no longer in fashion.”[8]
Jump up ^ Holgate, Mark, ′How Anthony Vaccarello Is Making Saint Laurent His Own′, (Feb. 13, 2018), Vogue March 2018, https://www.vogue.com/article/anthony-vaccarello-interview-vogue-march-2018-issue, Retrieved 3 March 2018.
It’s important to realize that the fashions associated with the Roaring Twenties, such as flapper dresses, were for adults only and not for children. The Victorian idea of the sanctity of childhood became even more firmly expressed in 1920s children’s clothing. Just as a girl wouldn’t wear lipstick or high heels, neither would she wear the elaborate, more revealing clothing of her older sisters. Childhood was a time of innocent fun, and this perspective was expressed in the simple styles of the era.
A doomed designer (his decline began soon after) is probably not the best lead-in to an article about the rise of designer children’s lines, though maybe it is. In the last year or two, Lanvin, Gucci, Stella McCartney and Marni have entered the market. A decade ago, Ralph Lauren’s template of a high-end lifestyle brand had few imitators. Dior had Baby Dior, founded in 1967 (before that, the house made outfits for some of its celebrated clients, like Elizabeth Taylor, who ordered matching tweed suits for herself and her daughter Liza), but the luxury-goods business, with justification, tended to regard itself as an adults-only world. Can you imagine a child’s version of Tom Ford’s Gucci? Versace? It would have interrupted the sex fantasy. And in the late ’90s, these companies were focused on the huge profits reaped from handbags.
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“I personally was so done with that type of dressing,” Ms. Welch said. “Even though Hillary Clinton lost the election, and we felt this unbelievable disappointment, I think there has been this awakening of women to all their different choices.” As a result, she said, when it came to her clients Ms. Negga and Sarah Paulson, another actress widely applauded for a style that was less revealing than regal, “we were looking at clothes that were about expressing themselves, feeling comfortable as themselves — Ruth loved a sleeve — while at the same time shielding them in a way.”
As women have found their voice politically, they have begun to express themselves sartorially, be it through white pantsuits, so-called pussy hats or the modest fashion movement. Clothes are an integral part of the debate over the freedom to make your own choices — whether about what you do with your body or who touches your body or what you put on your body — that began with the rise of gender-neutral dressing, picked up steam thanks to both the leaked tape of Mr. Trump talking about grabbing women and the debate over the hijab, and became even more visible during the Women’s March on Washington in January.
Fashion trends are influenced by several factors including political, economical, social and technological. Examining these factors is called a PEST analysis. Fashion forecasters can use this information to help determine growth or decline of a particular trend. Fashion trends change daily, it can not stay unchanged
The notion of a global fashion industry is a product of the modern age.[24] Prior to the mid-19th century, most clothing was custom-made. It was handmade for individuals, either as home production or on order from dressmakers and tailors. By the beginning of the 20th century—with the rise of new technologies such as the sewing machine, the rise of global capitalism and the development of the factory system of production, and the proliferation of retail outlets such as department stores—clothing had increasingly come to be mass-produced in standard sizes and sold at fixed prices.
Median annual wages for salaried fashion designers were $61,160 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $42,150 and $87,120.[9] The lowest 10 percent earned less than $32,150, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $124,780. Median annual earnings were $52,860 (£28,340) in apparel, piece goods, and notions – the industry employing the largest numbers of fashion designers.[10]

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One Reply to ““how fashion repeats itself””

  1. Fashion designers may work full-time for one fashion house, as ‘in-house designers’, which owns the designs. They may work alone or as part of a team. Freelance designers work for themselves, selling their designs to fashion houses, directly to shops, or to clothing manufacturers. The garments bear the buyer’s label. Some fashion designers set up their own labels, under which their designs are marketed. Some fashion designers are self-employed and design for individual clients. Other high-end fashion designers cater to specialty stores or high-end fashion department stores. These designers create original garments, as well as those that follow established fashion trends. Most fashion designers, however, work for apparel manufacturers, creating designs of men’s, women’s, and children’s fashions for the mass market. Large designer brands which have a ‘name’ as their brand such as Abercrombie & Fitch, Justice, or Juicy are likely to be designed by a team of individual designers under the direction of a design director.
    Girls’ dresses became short, loose, and made of cotton. Light cardigans were often worn over them. Summer shoes were usually made of canvas, making them lighter than the hard boots of the Victorian age. In winter, girls wore a heavy sailor suit or a serge skirt with a sweater, often with a matching beret. A knitted suit of long underwear went underneath and included attachments for holding up long stockings. After centuries of having long hair, most girls started wearing their hair short, often in a bob cut which they could have done at home. A big bow or ribbon adorned the simple style.
    Ms. Riley said, “Children have big tummies and stand in funny ways.” Although she has made one or two concessions to popular tastes, like making her ballet flats in nail-varnish colors, she remains fixed in her view that children should be children and not little brand ambassadors or, in the current parlance, “prostitots.” She said: “I can’t bear advertising on children. And why would a child need to have anything remotely sexy? To me, it’s unethical.”

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