“pehea lā e pili ai i keʻano a me kaʻoihana”

Ma mua o ka luʻu ʻana i ka hana o ka hālāwai, ua wehe ʻia ka hālāwai ma ke oli ʻana iā A Luna Au o Maunaloa, kekahi mele no ke Aliʻi Luka Keanolani Kanāhoahoa Keʻelikōlani, nona ka inoa o ke koleke ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi.  He mea mau ka hula pū ʻana i ia mele me nā kālāʻau.  He mele oli ia i oli ʻia no ka lōkahi ʻana o nā manaʻo, o nā kuanaʻike ma mua o ka luʻu piha ʻana i ke kūkākūkā ʻana.
Iʻelua pule i hala aku nei ua noi mai koʻu hoaaloha iaʻu e nānā i kēia pūnaewele. Ma hope o 3 mau lā ma hope o ke komoʻana i ka pūnaewele ua loaʻa iaʻu kahiʻoihana! I kēia manawa, ke kau nei au i ka papahana pūnaewele kaulana a no ka loaʻaʻana o nā kālā e uku ai no koʻu hale iho! Paipai wau i nā mea a pau e ho’āʻo i kēia,ʻo ia ka maikaʻi! ʻO ke kākoʻo a me ka lawelaweʻoihana ke poʻo o ka laina.
The abaya is most common in countries with large Muslim populations. Some denominations of Islam consider the entire female body, except for the face and hands, awrah – that which should be concealed in public from males unrelated by blood or marriage.
Ua heleʻo 988 makahiki he mau makahiki,ʻoiai e ulu ana nā mea. Ua hana maʻalahi ia i ka hana. “Wiwoʻole, ināʻo kēia ka mea āu e makemake aiʻAʻoleʻole, hoʻomaka lākou e’ōlelo. Eʻike maopopo i kahi e hele aiʻoe. Ma waena o nā mea i kaulana a me ka hakakā e pili ana i ka moemoeke nui,ʻo ia kaʻoiaʻiʻo e hiki ai iāʻoe ke loaʻa i ka wahine hoʻokamakama. ʻAe,ʻo ia kahi manaʻo hoʻopuka maikaʻi!
Managing with Aloha is a book designed to be written in, and used as both learning resource and personal workbook. Managing with Aloha is our philosophy bible, and this site can be thought of as the sequel to the book, where you are now the featured star.
I kēia manawa, hiki iāʻoe ke ola i ka’ōnaehana pona lapuwale a loaʻa ka manawa manawa piha a iʻole e hoʻonui i ka waiwai ma ka hoʻolakoʻana i nā mea i kākauʻia i nā mano o kā mākou mau hoa e pono ai iā lākou no kā lākou mau pūnaewele, blogs, books, magazines, marketing marketing and many more!
ʻO ka nānā ʻana i ke kumu o ka mauli ola Hawaiʻi ke hoʻopili ʻia mākou ma kona mau ʻaoʻao waiwai ʻike kuʻuna, lawena, ʻuhane a ʻōlelo, ka paepae no ka papahana hoʻōla ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi o ke Kuʻikahi o ke Koleke ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi ʻo Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani ma ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo. He kuʻikahi kēia nona nā papahana kula pae pēpē, kamaliʻi, kula haʻahaʻa, kula waena, kula kiʻekiʻe, kula nui a me ke Kikowaena Kilohōkū ʻo ʻImiloa.
Robert’s hula career began when he met his kumu, Maiki Aiu Lake, while a student at Kamehameha Schools. Robert was part of Aiu’s largest, and possibly most famous, 1973 ʻUniki Lehua class. It is during this time that Robert embraced his kumu and her mantra, “Hula Is Life.”
So we left with the red/silver gray lei. We did however walk away with more than just a feather lei. We walked away with new insight to the history and protocal revolving around the ancient-modern hawaiian culture.
In the introduction to his 1978 book Orientalism, scholar of comparative literature Edward Said confronts the complex, constructed understandings of one group of people as they seek to explain another, and discerns the implications.  Central to his thoughtful analysis is the recognition that the concepts of “Orient” and “Orientalism” belong to a Western paradigm that has both material and symbolic features.  Here, the Orient is a physical place defined by Europe both in terms of its geographic location adjacent to the European continent, and as an expression of Western power.
It wasn’t until Keoua started learning his ʻōlelo makuahine tht he realized that it was his responsibilit to perpetuate those skills that his kūpuna possessed lest they be lost. Unfortunately it was too late to learn from his grand-mother as her hands were not as nimble and her eyesight slowly faded.
I kekahi lā, ua ‘ike ‘ia aku kekahi kāne u‘i e Leialoha i ke kula. He papa kā Leialoha me ke kāne u‘i. I ko Leialoha manawa i ‘ike iā ia, ua mana‘o ‘o Leialoha, “Hū, ka u‘i o ke kāne! Makemake au iā ia! Makemake au e hui i kēlā kāne.” Akā, ‘a‘ole ‘o ia i ‘ōlelo iā ia. He mana‘o ko Leialoha.
Fast forward about 15 years…I had just graduated from college and joined Halau I Ka Wekiu. Our very first project as a new class was to make a yellow and brown lei hulu. Aunty Paulette actually danced with our Hiwa class in halau, so it was a wonderful to meet her at hula, and then visit her shop and make a lei hulu of my own under her guidance. Aunty Paulette was patient and kind, but she had an eye for perfection. If your lei hulu was inconsistent or had any trouble spots, she did not hesitate to snip your threads and remove inches and hours of hard work.  At the time, of course, this was frustrating, but it was always worth it in the end.  Under Aunty Paulette’s watch you could always create something magnificent.  Aunty Paulette bid this earth farewell last year.  I feel lucky to have made three lei hulu under her tutelage, and we are currently working on a kahili to match our latest lei hulu, that we crafted in Aunty Paulette’s last few weeks with us.  
His research was published in Indigenous Voices Research, Hūlili VIII: Multidisciplinary research on Hawaiian well-being and others. He studied painting with Master Artist and MAMo award recipient, Joe Hauʻoli Dowson, and continues to write poetry which has appeared in Tinfish, ʻŌiwi Journal, Bamboo Ridge and Mai Paʻa I Ka Leo.
I love reading so much and I have learned so much through books. textbooks aren’t the only book we learn from. Other characters actions and experiences are lessons and references for us. I read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe it was a great book and I loved it too!
Wahi hou a Perreira, “He waiwai mau ka hiki ke hui pū ka poʻe a pau. He waiwai ka papa, akā, ʻo ke kumu wale nō me kāna mau haumāna pau ma laila. Ke hui pū me kēia, hui pū nā manaʻo like ʻole a pau e hoʻoholo ai ke kanaka i kona manaʻo iho nō ma luna o kekahi kahua ʻike paʻa. He waiwai loa kēlā.”
Ma mua o ko lāua hui ʻana, ua ʻaʻe ʻia kona kapu e ʻelua aliʻi. Ua hele nihi akula lāua ma kahi o ko Kahalaopuna hale aliʻi a ʻike lihi aʻela i kona uʻi. Ma muli o ko lāua lili no ka lilo ʻole o Kahalaopuna i kekahi o lāua, hoʻopunipuni akula lāua iā Kauhi penei, ʻoiai ʻo ia e ʻauʻau ana ma Waikīkī, “Ua hoʻolei ʻia mai nei māua i ka lei e Kahalaopuna.” Ua piʻi maila ko Kauhi huhū a lili a hoʻoholo ihola ia e lawe i ke ola o Kahalaopuna a make.
Heels were provided for the walking portion of the event, as were pastel-colored rubber slippers for walkers opting out of heels. Teams and their sponsors were encouraged to donate to the cause, reaching their goal of $12,000. All proceeds went to the care and maintenance fund for the WHW shelter.
Manuhealiʻi Hawaiʻi White Green Tan Colorway Nā Palapalai (The Ferns) Print Coconut husk color buttons Short sleeve, firm sleeve cut. Size Medium ******** There is something soothing about a stand of palapalai ferns. Perhaps it is the vibrant green, or the lacy softness they add to the landscape. And it doesn’t hurt that the fine hairs on the fronds sparkle in sunlight that filters to the forest floor. Interesting that the early Hawaiians used the fern as a treatment for hehena (translation: insanity) according to the Hawaiian Enthnobotany online database. Palapalai is also valued as a plant sacred to the hula goddess Laka, and softly encircles the head, wrists, and ankles of the dancers of hula kahiko.
Great food and a good value for Hawaii. We normally stop at the bakery in Naalehu, which though good is a bit of a tourist trap. However, across the street is a hidden Gem. It is not much to look at inside and out, however the food is very good and they have home baked desserts which are amazing. I had some of the best Teriyaki Beef I have ever had and my wife had a great pulled pork sandwich. Next time we are traveling through Naalehu, Hana Hou is our new “must stop” place to eat. The locals eat there and now we know why.
This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Hopang Township Mongmaw Township (Minemaw) Pangwaun Township (Panwine) Namtit Subtownship Panlong Subtownship Matman Township (Metman) Namphan Township (Naphang) Pangsang Township (Pan San) Man Kan Subtownship
Wahi a Kaʻilihou, “Mākaukau lākou. I ka hoʻomaka ʻana, ua haʻalulu i ka paio me nā kumu. A laila, ua haʻalulu i ka paʻa kūpono i ka ʻikepili no nā nīnūnē ʻelua. A laila, ua haʻalulu nui i ka hoʻohana ʻana i ka ʻike ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. Akā naʻe, i kēia manawa, ua haʻalele iki lākou i kēlā haʻaluu, a laila ua hoʻohana maoli lākou i ko lākou ʻike ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. ʻO ia ka puka lanakila maoli.”
The store is a nice and cozy little store.  The store offers very reasonable and very unique feathers to make leis.  Feathers from the goose, to the rooster, to the peacock, to peasant, etc are all in the store ready for your selection.   Prices are very reasonable, and Aunty is always willing to give you a quick tip or hint if you ask.   There are several ready-made lei hulu for sale in a display case – made by the aunties and their haumana (students).   My favorite thing in the store is the royalty cape made purely of yellow and red feathers.  It’s one of Aunty Mary Lou’s most famous masterpieces!
I ka ‘ike ‘ana ‘o Ioane Kaahai i ka hō’ailona, a me ka mana’o o ka mea āna e li’a nei, lele a’ela ka hau’oli i loko ona, me he wai māpuna lā e hua’i ana, ani maila nō ho’i kona lima, me ke kūnou ‘ana mai o kona po’o, me ka mino’aka ka hau’oli e pā’ani ana i kona helehelena.
Do this for your business, and you will get in arm’s reach of Pono, the value of rightness and balance. Not only does Nānā i ke kumu encompass source and explain culture: It describes your full capacity moving forward.
I ka hopena pule, ua hele aku ‘o Leialoha i ka hale o kona tūtū. Ua ‘ike ‘ia aku ‘o Kalei e ia. Ua ‘ōlelo aku ‘o Leialoha, “E Kalei, hiki iā ‘oe ke kākau i ka mo‘olelo no ka‘u papa?” Akamai loa ‘o Kalei; he haumāna maika‘i ‘o ia. Ua ‘ōlelo mai ‘o Kalei, “‘A‘ole hiki. Hewa kēlā.” Huhū ‘o Leialoha. ‘Ōlelo aku ‘o ia, “Mai wahapa‘a mai ‘oe ia‘u! E kākau ‘oe i ka‘u mo‘olelo! E hele aku ‘oe i kahi ‘ē!” Ua mana‘o ‘o Kalei, “Auē nō ho‘i ē! Moloā loa a mākonā loa kēia wahine! Inā pēlā, e a‘o aku au iā ia he ha‘awina.” No laila, ua ‘ōlelo aku ‘o Kalei, “Hiki nō. E lawe aku au i ka mo‘olelo i ke kula i ka lā ‘āpōpō.”
Out for my weekly pilgrimage to the Wednesday Downtown Curbside bites lunch,  I perused that weeks trucks and spotted one that I had never seen before.  What was this light blue truck?…… Hawaiian. Ooooh, I love Hawaiian.  Give me a big mound of Pork and rice and I am one happy camper.  I was totally excited to try it, and led my lunch buddies over to the truck.  2 of us tried the Kalua Pork plates and another tried the lumpia.  The lumpia was really, really oily.  The rice that came with the pork was the sticky gelatinous kind which my friend really liked.  The pork was ok.  It lacked a little saltiness and that smoked flavor that usually comes with being smoked in an imu all day, but it was moist.  The sandwich version comes with BBQ sauce so that one probably had more flavor.  The employees were super nice and my food was ready really quickly, so two pluses for them.  
Inā makemakeʻoe i kahi smartwatch me ke kiʻekiʻe loa o ka puʻuwai o ka naʻau, he mea maikaʻi kēia no ka hoʻolālāʻana i kahi puʻupuʻu kūikawā mai o Samsung, kahi mea nui i hoʻohālikelikeʻia i nā mea akamai loa ma ke kahua kūʻai.

“pehea ka nui o nā mea hana hana e ukuʻia”

In 1991, Na Lima Mili Hulu No’eau opened its’ doors in Kapahulu. Aunty Mary Lou, Uncle Paul (husband) and Paulette Kahalepuna (daughter) set up shop in this location where Mele Kahalepuna Chun (grand daughter) continues the work and traditions.
He manawa kūpono loa kēia no nā kākau kākau freelance a me ka mea paha e pili ana i nā mea hiki ke kākau i kēlā manawa wale nōʻaʻole loaʻa kahi manawa e holo ai i kahi hopena make, hana manawa manawa. A, no ka mea e makemake kekahi e noho i loko o kā lākou mau hale lole a hana i ka hale!
Kūkākūkā akula ʻo Uʻilani Chong (ka wahine ʻekolu mai ka hema aku), ʻo ʻAnakē Uʻi hoʻi wahi a kona mau hoapapa i kapa aku ai iā ia, me kona mau hoa no kēia mea ʻo ka mauli ola Hawaiʻi a me ka welo i ʻike ʻia ma nā kānaka e hoʻōla ana i ka moʻomeheu Hawaiʻi.  He mea koʻikoʻi nō ka ʻike leʻa o nā ʻelele pākahi a pau no ko lākou pikoʻu iho ma mua o ka puka ʻana aku i ke ao holoʻokoʻa.  ʻO Alohilani Maiava, Uʻilani Ige, a me Kawehi Lopez nā lālā ʻē aʻe o ko ʻAnakē Uʻi pūʻulu.
ʻO ka lā hope o Pōʻalima hope loa no ka mahinaʻo Iulai aʻoʻAukake i hiki ai i ke kūlana o ke kūlana kūkākūkā me Iulai 85.975 a meʻAukake 85.875. He mea maikaʻi eʻike. Hoʻomaka ka manawa o nā hua puaʻa a hui pūʻia me kahi US $ lalo iho o ia mea e kōkua wale i ka pila puaʻa puaʻaʻoi aʻe. ʻOkakopa ka pauʻana i ka 70.575 Friday i kahi kumukūʻai kūpono no kēlā manawa o ka makahiki. Hōʻike kēia kumukūʻai iā mākouʻaʻole ka hopohopo o ka mea kūʻai kālepaʻoihana no ka lawaʻana o ka packer i kēia hāʻule. Eʻike iāʻoe i ka Expo.
The abaya “cloak” (colloquially and more commonly, Arabic: عباية‎ ʿabāyah , especially in Literary Arabic: عباءة ʿabāʾah ; plural عبايات ʿabāyāt , عباءات ʿabāʾāt ), sometimes also called an aba, is a simple, loose over-garment, essentially a robe-like dress, worn by some women in parts of the Muslim world including in North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.[1] Traditional abayat are black and may be either a large square of fabric draped from the shoulders or head or a long caftan. The abaya covers the whole body except the head, feet, and hands. It can be worn with the niqāb, a face veil covering all but the eyes. Some women also wear long black gloves, so their hands are covered as well.
Literally translated, Nānā i ke kumu means ‘look to your source’ recognizing an inner wellspring inside each and every one of us. We look within, and self reflect to get healthy, in body, mind and spirit. This is one’s wellspring of identity and intuition, intellect and emotion, values and beliefs, lessons learned and ancestral knowledge, all personal and professional alike.
Oh, and don’t be spooked if you see that only a small number of people have RSVP’ed. That happens every week. There are always a whole lot more folks attending each week than there are RSVP’s. That’s fine with us – RSVP’ing helps us out quite a bit but it’s never necessary. Haven’t RSVP’ed? Not a problem – come on out anyway. You’ll definitely have plenty of company.
This is an easy place to recommend. My wife and I ate here twice, once for dinner and once for breakfast. For dinner we had the Planko Fish dinner which was fabulous! Unfortunately we didn’t have room for dessert! Two days later we stopped for…More
Ma ke kapu Ku, ekolu po e kapu ai ma ka po o Hilo ke kapu ana, ma ke ao o Kulua i noa [a]i, o ke kapu Hua po alua ke kapu ana, ma ka po o Mohalu e kapu ai, a me ke ao o Akua e noa e [a]i, o ke kapu Kaloa elua po e kapu ai, ma ka po, o Olepau e kapu ai, a me ke ao o Kaloakulua e noa ai, o ke kapu Kane, alua po e kapu ai, ma ka po o Kane e kapu ai, ma ke ao o Mauli e noa ai.
2013.09.17.Tue HANAHOUの大ファン 三茶から半年間でもう4回目のご来店 9月22日がbirthdayですが 一足先にサプライズ でも 動画のonとoff間違えて 1秒動画 そして この日は他にもHANAHOUの常連様がお越しいただいてました! そして久しぶりにBuddyも出勤でした♪ 遠く県外からBuddyに会いに来たけど会えなくて(>_<)ってお客様も多いのですが 今日はラッキー! owner夫妻がいらしてる日は店内は通常の何倍も華やかに! ハッピームード満載です! 2371 ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ke kāne, ʻo Pōʻeleʻi ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki ʻakena a haʻanui. Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the husband, Pōʻeleʻi (Supreme-dark-one) the wife; a child born to them is a boaster and an exaggerator. Heels were provided for the walking portion of the event, as were pastel-colored rubber slippers for walkers opting out of heels. Teams and their sponsors were encouraged to donate to the cause, reaching their goal of $12,000. All proceeds went to the care and maintenance fund for the WHW shelter. Our October/November issue is out! Inside you'll find a visit to Hilo's hundred-year-old Suisan Fish Market, a behind the scenes look at Hawai‘i State Archive's collection of flags and standards from the days of the Hawaiian Monarchy, how particles falling onto Mauna Loa from space could provide answers about the origins of life on Earth and much, much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Ma luna o ka puʻu, e kuhi ke kumu i nā wahi pana a me nā kūpuna o ka moʻolelo (Akaka, Nālehuaoakaka, Kauhi ma Waʻahila). E kuhi nō hoʻi i ke ākea o ke awāwa me ka haʻi ʻana i nā haumāna, “E pili ka maka a mahuʻi i nā loʻi i uhi iā lalo o ke awāwa e like me kā Kupuna Maka i wehewehe ai. E kaʻakaʻa ka maka i kēia manawa. ʻOkoʻa i kēia wā, ʻeā?” We have, to the best of our ability, provided orthographic editing for the Kuokoa's original text. In some cases, we have left this text unaltered in deference to what might be termed the "meaningful ambiguity" of certain unmarked words and phrases. We've left other passages unaltered in recognition of our inability to properly understand them. The reader is encouraged to form his own conclusions by viewing the original at Ulukau: The Hawaiian Electronic Library. Readers unfamiliar with the sound of ho'āeae are directed to Kalani Akana's rendition of "Mele Ho'oipoipo" on the CD Nā Kumu Hula, Songs From the Source v.1, SCHH CD-7100. A wela nā pōhaku, kīpapa ʻia nā pōhaku ma lalo o ka imu a ma hope o kēlā, ua wikiwiki loa ka hana.  I ia manawa, laulima mākou no ka nui o ka hana a no ka wikiwiki.  Hoʻokomo ʻia nā pā kini ʻiʻo, ka pūmaiʻa i kīhaehae ʻia, ka lau maiʻa, ka lāʻī, nā ʻekemauʻu, a laila ke kapolina i ʻole e pakele aku ka māhu.  A hoʻomaha ihola mākou. Pierre Cardin Hawaiian Shirt Mens Size 2XL XXL Casual Camp Aloha Floral Print Material: 100% Rayon. Size: 2XL (XXL). Condition: See "Condition Notes", above. Made In Korea. RN Number 13185. Pattern/Print: Colorful tropical flowers and silhouettes of pineapples on a gray background. Measurements: Chest: 26.5 inches from underarm seam to underarm seam. Length: 31 inches from back collar seam to bottom hem edge. Measurements were taken with garment laying on a flat surface. Please message me with questions you may have before making a purchase and I will get back to you as soon as I possibly can. Thank you for visiting and viewing. "Hoʻokūkū, hoʻonānā, e nānā kou maka i ka mahina." Ma ka ʻāluna ahiahi o ka lā 31 o ʻOkakopa i huli ʻia ai ka mahina puāhilo o ka pō mahina ʻo Hilo. He ʻauinalā kēia i helu pō ʻia he hopena o Mauli (ma ke ʻano o ka helu pō o ke kuhi ʻana i ka pō ʻo Hilo ma ka lā a Shaukat Kāne e koho ai i ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana nō o ka mahina puāhilo, ʻaʻole wale nō ma ke ʻano o ka helu pō mai ka ʻike maka, koe ma ka lā e koho ʻia ai ka ʻike maka ʻana inā mōakaaka loa ka lani aiʻole ma hope o ka loaʻa mua me ka ʻohe nānā, ʻo ia ka lā e pono ai ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana o ka mahina puāhilo), a he ahiahi i helu pō ʻia he hoʻomaka o Muku. Ua koho ʻia ka napoʻo ʻana o ka lā ma kahi o ka manawa hola 5:55 a me ka napoʻo ʻana o ka mahina ma kahi o 7:01. ʻAno lōʻihi kēia manawa, he 66 minuke nō, ma waena o ka napoʻo ʻana o ka lā a me ka napoʻo ʻana o ka mahina (aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneDay.php). Ua koho ʻo Shaukat Kāne ma moonsighting.com i ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana nō o ka mahina puāhilo ma Hawaiʻi ma kēia lā 31 o ʻOkakopa (http://moonsighting.com/visibilitycurves/1438sfr_10-31-2016.gif), akā ʻike ʻia ma ka ʻohe nānā ma ka lā 30 o ʻOkakopa (http://moonsighting.com/visibilitycurves/1438sfr_10-30-2016.gif). Excellent hawaiian style button up ss shirt with chest pocket. Pit to pit is 28.5" with 32" length from back collar seam to hem. Its in great condition. Ask any questions... USA buyers only. Thanks for looking! Throughout the week that Hōkūleʻa was docked in Mānele Bay, community members of Lānaʻi and visitors alike were encouraged to visit the canoe, take tours, and learn about the vessel and its upcoming worldwide mission. One of the student groups that joined in were the haumāna of Nā Pua Noʻeau Lānaʻi. After opening a successful boutique store in Glades Shopping Centre, Bromley, we now offer our customers a platform to buy their favourite urban wear, online. As a growing contemporary urban menswear brand, we offer the height of fashion at an affordable price. Everything we sell has been manufactured in the finest factories and designed exclusively for NA Menswear. So if you're looking for something unique, you've come to the right place. I ka ʻauinalā nei, ua hālāwai mākou no ka wā hope loa ma mua o ko mākou haʻalele ʻana no Iāpana a ua nui ʻino nō nā mea e nānā ai!  Ua hoʻomaka ka hālāwai ma ka hui kelekiʻi ʻana me Maya, kekahi o nā lālā ʻoluʻolu palena ʻole o ka ʻAha ʻAmelika-Iāpana no Wakinekona D.C.  Wehewehe maila ʻo ia no ia mea ʻo ka ʻAha ʻAmelika-Iāpana a ma kā lākou hana, pēlā nō no ka pili o ka papahana Tomodachi Scholars me kā lākou mau hana ʻē aʻe.  Ua hiki nō iā mākou ke haʻi iā ia i ko mākou mau manaʻo no ka huakaʻi, nā mea e ʻike ʻia ana nō paha a me nā mea e hana ʻia ana nō paha kekahi. Today I had the teriyaki bowl from heaven' 100% made with love' I can't believe I had no problem with the chicken. Wow the protein was so juicy and yummy it made me cry inside because God has hook us up with this real  beautiful food truck from the heaven's ' gosh the rice was on point too and the presentation was super amazing '  ahh I'm happy ' ! I also  got a fish sando' sandwich ' I felt the moment of joy and extreme happiness  because another amazing meal from the heaven above ' one of my favorite spot 100% 2018 Thanks a million ! Author Mahealani Uchiyama trained in Hawaii in the hula lineage of Joseph Kamoha'i Kaha'ulelio and is currently the Kumu Hula at the Halau Ku Ua Tuahine in Berkeley, California. As the founder and artistic director of the Center for International Dance and board member of Dance Arts West, the producers of San Francisco's annual Ethnic Dance Festival, Uchiyama's approach to hula is deeply holistic and reflects her background in indigenous wisdom traditions and cultural exchange and interaction. The lives of Five-0's informants are in danger when the HPD system is hacked and one ends up dead, forcing McGarrett to enlist the help of hacker Aaron Wright (Joey Lawrence), who he just imprisoned. Joey Lawrence Returns as Aaron Wright. After getting our malasadas at the bakery across the street from this restaurant, we came here for lunch, and met the cream pie and carrot cake offerings in the case on our way in! Now we had to plan a smaller lunch so we could...More 'O ka inoa o kēia kaikamahine 'o Helena Kalanilehua, a mamuli o ka u'i o kēia kaikamahine, ua ho'opi'i 'ia ke kuko i loko o ('Aiwohikupua), makua kāne kōlea no ke kaikamahine a kāna wahine me ke kāne mua, a lāua nō ho'i i hānai ihola a nui. On Saturday, January 21, the UH Maui College Great Lawn overflowed with protestors participating in the Women’s March On Washington- Maui Style. Women, men and children marched in solidarity with the large protest in Washington D.C. which attracted an estimated 500,000 people. Sister protests took place not only across the country but around the world to take a stand for human rights. “We are rising for our sisters, our mothers, and our daughters and our selves in one unifying act to show we are only going forward, we will not go back,” said Maui march organizer Robin Pilus as the crowd cheered. Ua 'ike mau kēia makua kāne i kēia keiki i ka hele ma ia alanui i nā lā āpau, a ua hā'upu mua nō paha 'o ia e hiki mai ana i ka manawa e haunaele ai 'o 'Ewa i ka Moa'e, no laila e 'ōlelo mau ana 'o ia i kahi māmā ona, e mālama pono i ka mo'opuna. Vintage photo booth of girl with attitude. Old photograph of a young African American girl posing in a photo booth sometime during the Written above her in faded ink is “Mozella.” There is nothing to indicate where this photograph was taken. The Women’s March On Washington- Maui Style attracted an estimated crowd of 5,000 people. The sea of marched up and down Kaahumanu Avenue holding their signs high and chanting. Protesters participated to not only stand up for women’s rights but also to advocate for equal rights for immigrants, all ethnicities and disabilities as well as to show opposition to President Trump. [redirect url='http://fashionyc.com/bump' sec='7']

“kahi e loaʻa ai iaʻu ka lole lole”

Ke kiʻi ma ka’ākau, E hoike mai i kaʻeho ka huamoa o ma ka hapalua. Radiologists ana i ke ahonui o ko lakou naau i ka ike e imi ana i ka ikaika Ka maʻi ‘aʻai pepehi ai a pau i ka mea i manaoia me nā māhele uuku o ka pāhawewe.
Hana i nā leo e hiki ai ke kiʻi i kāu keiki hou e nānā i ke kanaka a pana pua. E hoʻoponopono iāʻoe iho, e ke kanaka’ōpio. E lawe i ka hauʻoli hauʻoli i ka hānauʻana a me ka launa pūʻana me kāu huakaʻi hou. No kaʻikeʻana, e nānā i nā manaʻo heluhelu i lalo nei.
My own scholarship belongs to the discipline of Cultural Anthropology, with a specific interest in the peoples of the island Pacific. I am biologically male with a masculine gender identity. I am not myself an indigenous person, nor a native speaker of any language other than American English. As such, my experiential and epistemological biases may be different from any indigenous people, individuals with other gender identities or sexual orientations, biological females, Sociologists, Psychologists, or Linguists among you. I invite your thoughtful and authentic participation in any of the conversations you find here, and I encourage you to add your wisdom to the discourse.
Catherine Maxwell read English literature for her BA and D.Phil. at St Hugh’s College, Oxford where she was subsequently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow from 1990-1993. She then joined the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary, University of London, becoming Professor of Victorian Literature in 2009. She is the author of The Female Sublime from Milton to Swinburne: Bearing Blindness (Manchester University Press, 2001), Swinburne (Northcote House, 2006), and Second Sight: The Visionary Imagination in Late Victorian Literature (Manchester University Press, 2008), as well as numerous articles on Victorian poetry and prose.
The holiday season is officially here and so is our December/January issue! Inside you’ll find a bittersweet look at the final days of Hawai‘i’s sugar industry, a visit with the ancients at Moloka‘i’s Ka Hula Piko Festival, an inside scoop on what scientists at UH Manoa’s Venom Lab are up to and much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
This encore presentation of select recipes that help to define Hawaii’s unique palate continues to answer the question: what do Hawaii folks like to eat? There weren’t enough pages in the first book, what Hawaii Likes to Eat to include all of our favorite recipes, so consider this the second course.
Bio: Keoua Nelson grew up in Napoʻopoʻo, South Kona on the hores of Kealakekua Bay and comes from a long line of lauhala weavers from Kona; both of his great-grandmothers, Lucy Keliʻihelewalemahuna (Kaʻalekahi) Grace and Gracey Kaleihulumamo (Grace) Gaspar, learned their skills from their mothers. While the women in the famiyl were relegated to weaving the lauhala products, it was the men in the family who were tasked with caring, cleaning and preparing leaves from the pū hala.
Most of the posts to follow will be case studies in these topics, while others may be investigations into the historical development of an idea or practice. Some will no doubt be discussions of rather abstract theoretical issues, though these will develop from concrete questions. A few may be annotated reference lists, but I hope that every post will be interesting and enjoyable in its own way.
E like me ke ‘ano mau o kūpuna, he pūlama i nā mo’opuna, pēlā nō kēia kupunawahine, ua lilo kēia kaikamahine i mea nui iā ia, ‘a’ole ona nānā he pāpā ‘oko’a ko kēia kaikamahine, akā ua kau aku nō kona mana’o make’e mo’opuna, e like ho’i me ka lilo ‘ana o kāna māmā i kaikamahine nāna.
The lives of Five-0’s informants are in danger when the HPD system is hacked and one ends up dead, forcing McGarrett to enlist the help of hacker Aaron Wright (Joey Lawrence), who he just imprisoned. Joey Lawrence Returns as Aaron Wright.
For Said, Orientalism represents a dynamic relationship with the “Other” that has implications as a cultural lens.  First, it is a discursive lens.  That is to say, Orientalism is a reflexive and self-sustaining set of particular narratives which frame notions of the Orient and its people.  Second, it is an expression of imperial power.  According to this view, being defined by its European colonizers, Orientalism cannot be disassociated from the wider sociopolitical complex to which Western scholars belong, and from the hegemonic agendas implicit to their work.  Finally, it is perhaps more representative of the West than it claims to be of the East.
Oh, and don’t be spooked if you see that only a small number of people have RSVP’ed. That happens every week. There are always a whole lot more folks attending each week than there are RSVP’s. That’s fine with us – RSVP’ing helps us out quite a bit but it’s never necessary. Haven’t RSVP’ed? Not a problem – come on out anyway. You’ll definitely have plenty of company.
Hele mai ʻo Kawelo-mahamaha-iʻa mai Kauaʻi mai a kū i luna o Konahuanui a nānā mai i lalo nei. Kīloi mai ʻo ia i ka ihe makawalu a kū i lalo o ka honua a huʻe i ka lepo a me ka pōhaku. A kapa ʻia ka inoa o kēia wahi ʻo “Kūkaʻōʻō.” Manaʻo ʻia, aia ma loko o Kūkaʻōʻō kahi i kū ai kā Kawelo ihe ʻōʻō. Mai luna mai o ka heiau, ʻike ʻia ka mānoa maoli o nei awāwa ʻo Mānoa a me ke kahe pono ʻana o ka wai mai uka mai. Ua koho pono ʻo Kawelo i kona wahi e waiho ai i kāna ihe ʻōʻō.
ʻO ka hana kumu o ko Ke Kulanui Kaiāulu ʻo Honolulu e hoʻoholo i ka hoʻonaʻuaao ʻana i nā haumāna like ʻole āpau ma nā hana aʻo pono he nui, me nā hana e holomua ai i nā mea kumu manaʻo pono, ka paipai ʻana i ka hoʻoulu pono i nā haumāna āpau, me ke kuleana e lawelawe i nā haumāna ʻōiwi Hawaiʻi a e lawelawe i nā kānaka o ke kaiāulu e huli ana i ke ola ame ka naʻauao no ka pono o nā lāhui kānaka a puni ka honua, ma nā papa hana hana noʻeau, ke kākoʻo ʻana i nā haumāna e makemake ai e hele i ke kulanui ame nā papa hana ʻoihana pākōlea like ʻole.
MENS M2111501 NAVY INK BLUE L/S WINTER COAT FIELD JACKET. MARC JACOBS. MARC BY. STAY WARM FOR WINTER TIME. IT HAS ADJUSTABLE DRAW PULL STRINGS. IT IS TWO FRONT BOTTOM FLAP OVER POCKET. WEAR THIS AWESOME COAT!
Our streetwear fashion collection consists of a range of sleek suits for men, casual jackets, hoodies, formal shirts, t shirts and men’s accessories. So whether you’re looking to get suited and booted, working out, or simply looking for the latest line of modern urban essentials. NA Menswear will keep you looking dapper, no matter the occasion.
Thanks to a $2.7 million Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) partnership grant, Wai‘anae Coast students have more opportunities to succeed both in high school and as they pursue college degrees. See story »
Noho nā akua, nā ʻaumākua, a me nā kupua ma Mānoa e laʻa ʻo Kahalaopuna–ke kaikamahine ali‘i kapu o Mānoa, kona kinolau ʻo ke ānuenue, a me kona ʻaumakua ʻo ka pueo. E lohe ana ʻoukou i kekahi moʻolelo no Kahalaopuna i kēia lā a e ʻikemaka ana paha ʻoukou i kona kinolau a me nā kinolau o kona ʻohana.
Aloha nō e ka lama kū o ka No’eau. Ua pio ke kukui o ke ola. He pio ‘ole na’e ka mālamalama o ka ‘uhane. The entire Hawaiian language immersion world knows the name Sam L. “No’eau” Warner. His books have inspired a… View Obituary & Service Information
Came by my office down in Sorrento valley. Food was good. I personally didn’t like the teriyaki sauce as much, it was a bit overwhelming. Service was good. $8 for the bowls an extra $1 for vegetables added. Not a fan of the price but it’s a food truck.
We hope you’re all enjoying a fantastic start to the new year, and we’re excited to share that our February/March issue is here! In it you’ll find out what gaggles of nēnē geese are doing in Europe, what it’s like to be a pint-sized skipper in Hawai‘i’s sailing scene, what it takes to become the first female lifeguard on O‘ahu’s famous North Shore and much, much more! As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
Hele aku lākou i loko o ke kai. A‘o aku ‘o Pāpā i nā keiki kāne e kū i ka papa he‘enalu. ‘A‘ole hiki iā Kawika ke kū i ka papa he‘enalu. E pūhili ana nō ‘o Kawika. Akā, ahonui loa ‘o Pāpā. ‘A‘ole i li‘uli‘u, a hiki iā Kawika ke kū i ka papa he‘e nalu. Hau‘oli nō ‘o Kawika.
Kawika has been an active artist participant in MAMo: Maoli Arts Movement since 2012, and in 2013, was awarded a Master’s Apprenticeship through the Hawaiʻi State State Foundation in the Culture and the Arts with his hulu master, Paullette Kahalepuna (2014 MAMo Awardee, and 2014 ʻŌʻō Awards Recepient). Under this apprenticeship with Paullette, Kawika studied Hawaiian feather work in the forms of lei (adornment), kahili (feather standard), ahuʻula (cape), and mahiʻole (helmets). He also studied works from traditional materials, and how to use, cultivate, and preserve these materials.
Because makaʻāinana worked intimately with the land and the ocean to produce food, clothing, transportation, supplies, and other necessities, they were stewards of the land. Makaʻāinana performed the majority of the critical day-to-day tasks of their community.
Spring break is right around the corner! It’s time to fill out the laptop permission form to let us know if your student is turning in their laptop to their advisory class, or keeping their laptop over the break. We’ve been fortunate to have no laptop losses or damages over the breaks in the last few years. Over 50% of student keep their laptops over each break.
#sonnychingcollection #sonnyching #sccollection #paradisusjewelry #ku #sonnychingbling #hnmop #kumanifestation #kakau #fromaculture #ohekapla #jewelrydesigner #kumu #culturallyinspired #theoriginal #hawaiian #hawaiianjewelry #silver #sterlingsilver #jewelry #aotd
This is an easy place to recommend. My wife and I ate here twice, once for dinner and once for breakfast. For dinner we had the Planko Fish dinner which was fabulous! Unfortunately we didn’t have room for dessert! Two days later we stopped for…More
Ua kipa ʻē ʻoukou i ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī a me Ka Papa Loʻi ʻo Kānewai a eia ʻoukou i ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike ʻo Mānoa Heritage i kēia lā. Aia kēia hale a me ka papa loʻi kalo ʻo Kānewai i uka ma Mānoa a aia ka muliwai o Waikīkī i kai ma kahi o ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī (nānā paha i ka palapala ʻāina). ʻAno mamao nā wahi ʻekolu akā pili lākou a pau. No ke aha? Pehea e pili ai?–ka wai (kahe ka wai mai uka a i kai, mai ka papa loʻi kalo a i ka muliwai).
Our October/November issue is out! Inside you’ll find a visit to Hilo’s Suisan Fish Market, a behind the scenes look at Hawai‘i State Archive’s collection of flags and standards from the days of the Hawaiian Monarchy, how particles falling onto Mauna Loa from space could provide answers about the origins of life on Earth and much, much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
Mamuli o ka pane ho’omāhie a kēia u’i, ua kū ihola ua keiki nei ma waho mai o ka pā, me ka hilina’i ‘ana mai a ‘ōlelo maila: “Inā ho’i hā pēlā, he ho’i no ka lā’au lapa’au, he aha auane’i ho’i ka waiwai o ka hele ‘ana, ua loa’a ihola nō ke o’io’ina ‘o ‘oe!”
Pili ke kanaka a me ka ʻāina; aia kākou i ka moʻokūʻauhau like e laʻa ʻo Kahalaopuna: ʻo kona kupuna kāne ka puʻu ʻoiʻoi ʻo Akaka; ʻo kona kupunahine ka ulu lehua ʻo Nālehuaoakaka (e ʻimi i ka ʻohiʻa lehua ma nā māla o MHC.); ʻo kona mau mākua ka ua Tuahine a me ka makani ʻo Kahaukani; ʻo kona ʻaumākua ka pueo a me ka ʻelepaio.

“no ke aha eʻono ai ke kiʻi kiʻi kiʻi”

“It’s amazing how much support we have in the community, I just want to thank everyone for coming out,” said WHW Executive Director Stacey Moniz. The nonprofit organization was established in 1977 in an effort to assist female victims of domestic violence; the West Maui Domestic Violence Task Force is the Lahaina branch of the organization.
Ka Huaka‘i I Ka Hale Ali‘i ‘O ‘Iolani – Haumāna will learn “Ka Na‘i Aupuni” in honor of Ka Mō‘ī Kamehameha and “Makalapua” in honor of Ka Mō‘ī Wahine Lili‘uokalani.  This will help to enhance their understanding of the significance of their statues near ‘Iolani Palace.
Beginning of a dialog window, including tabbed navigation to register an account or sign in to an existing account. Both registration and sign in support using google and facebook accounts. Escape will close this window.
We plan our day trips from Kona to the Volcanoes National Park around our lunch stop at Hana Hou. Seriously, see that photo up there? That’s my plate every visit. It is a papaya stuffed with chicken salad made with macadamia nuts. My husband usually…More
The most obvious benefit to members of the club are the activities provided. At the beginning of the year, we have a “Welcome Back” picnic, so members can socialize and meet each other. About a week before Thanksgiving, the club goes on shopping trips to buy clothes and necessities for winter. During the break, the students who stay on campus participate in a number of activities, including getting together for a potluck dinner, going shopping, playing football, and going skiing. The last activity for the Fall semester is the annual Christmas Banquet, a nice dinner on campus where members can come together for one last time before going home for the holidays.
The store is a nice and cozy little store.  The store offers very reasonable and very unique feathers to make leis.  Feathers from the goose, to the rooster, to the peacock, to peasant, etc are all in the store ready for your selection.   Prices are very reasonable, and Aunty is always willing to give you a quick tip or hint if you ask.   There are several ready-made lei hulu for sale in a display case – made by the aunties and their haumana (students).   My favorite thing in the store is the royalty cape made purely of yellow and red feathers.  It’s one of Aunty Mary Lou’s most famous masterpieces!
was established at the University of Hawai’i at Hilo in 1989 for the purpose of increasing educational enrichment opportunities for Hawaiian children in grades Kindergarten – 12th. Outreach centers were later established on the islands of Maui, Kaua’i, O’ahu and Moloka’i, Lana’i and the West side of the Island of Hawai’i to expand activities throughout the State of
No nā hana mālama pono ʻana i ko ka honua – no ke kākoʻo ʻana mai i nā hana pono e pili ana i ka mālama ʻana i nā mea ulu, ame ka hoʻokahua ʻana i nā hana pono i waena o kekahi i kekahi, ame nā mea maoli ko ke ao nei.
Vintage photo booth of girl with attitude. Old photograph of a young African American girl posing in a photo booth sometime during the Written above her in faded ink is “Mozella.” There is nothing to indicate where this photograph was taken.
The Women’s March On Washington- Maui Style attracted an estimated crowd of 5,000 people. The sea of people marched up and down Kaahumanu Avenue holding their signs high and chanting. Protesters participated to not only stand up for women’s rights but also to advocate for equal rights for immigrants, all ethnicities and disabilities as well as to show opposition to President Trump.
afir ap’nā ap’né apan Babu bahut bāp-ké Basti beat began Benares Bengali Bés beta Bhagalpur bhai Bhatri Bhojpuri BHOJPURI DIALECT BIHARI brother Calcutta Champaran character Chhattisgarhi chhi consonant Cuckoo Cuttack Darbhanga dhan dialect District EASTERN GROUP Eastern Hindi Eastern Magahi father first genitive ghar Gorakhpur Grammar Ham”rā hamar him-to India INDO-ARYAN FAMILY Jashpur kah”lak kaili Kaithi kari khusi kuchh language letter Magahi MAGAHI DIALECT Maithili Manbhum me-to Monghyr Muzaffarpur my-own nahi niman nouns number of speakers O-kar oblique form ok”rā Oriyā Palamau Parganas Plur plural pronounced pronunciation Provinces Purnea rahal rahé Ranchi sabh Saran Shahabad Sing Singh speak spoken Standard Bhojpuri Standard Maithili stra SUB-DIALECT swine Tab ü The-son the-younger thee thou tohar TRANSLITERATION TRANSLITERATION AND TRANSLATION U-man Un-kar verb vowel Western Bhojpuri word Your-Honour’s
In historic fashion the Hana Hou 18’s for the second consecutive year has earned the prestigious ” American Bid” for the USAV Junior National Championships. The 18’s JO’s will be from April 27-29, 2018 at the Anaheim Convention Center.
No, I am not a lei maker nor a hula dancer but was in the market for a very “special” feather lei to be given to a Kahunanui. I had no idea where to get a “special” feather lei, let alone “a feather lei a gift’??? There is protocal when it comes to gifts to Kahunanui’s and I didn’t know where to begin. So, I contact my fellow yelper Marko M. who, without missing a beat, fires off an email to me explaining 1) where I should go, 2) what I should get, 3) who I should speak to, etc.  Taking his advice….
Men’s fashion can be simple, sleek and straightforward, or inventive and daring. Whatever direction you choose to take, you’ll find the building blocks of a deep and versatile wardrobe in this selection of men’s apparel. Having great style is about matching your personality and attitude with your clothing. From matched suits all the way down to socks, you’ll find amazing designs that allow you to feel comfortable and look great. You’ll be amazed at the variety of chic outfits you can make with a blazer, a few solid button down shirts and an excellent pair of pants from this collection. Dive into this large selection and find your next best look today.
afflicted animal ankh applied Arabic beat beautiful bhang bird body boil Brahman called caste cause cloth coin colour comp concealed dār deceit Deity denotes desire dignity dish distress dress earth elephant epithet fakir favour female fire flatulent flower fortune friendship fruit gold grain ground hair hand harām head Hindi Hindus honá honour horse hukka India interj intoxicated jānā jewels kāfir karna kind of sweetmeat king kur,án labour lagānā lāna land lená marriage means Mecca ment mode Musalmāns musical mode ness night one’s ornament pain parched grain Persian person plough possessed prince pron prosperity relating religious revenue rice royal ruined Sanskrit season servant snake sound species splendour string stupid sweetmeat tarika thing thread tion tree Vedas vessel village Vishnu vulg wicked wife woman word worn
Aloha Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia! Everyone in Hawai‘i is proud to welcome you home from your three-year journey circumnavigating the globe, bearing message of peace and mālama honua–caring for the Earth–from Polynesia to eighty-five ports in twenty-six countries. We at Hana Hou! have been honored to follow the wa‘a on this and other voyages. Mahalo for the opportunity to participate in your amazing achievement and share your story. May there be many more journeys to come.
nā ʻōlelo a Maka Woolsey (kekahi kupa no Mānoa) i palapala ʻia ma kekahi ninaninau me Theodore Kelsey (Kelsey Collection, Hawaii State Archives circa 1930) a i unuhi ʻia e Kawika Winter ma ka ʻōlelo haole (Oral History: A Walk Through Old Mānoa, 2004)

“kahi e hanaʻia ai nā kiʻi kiʻi i loko o ka hou hou”

The second most important component to our educational pedagogy is family learning. At NKW we build canoes and programs that build communities, but the core of our communities lies with our individual families. When families can engage in a program together, NKW found that their learning also continues after they have left our physical presence to return home. Family learning also contributes towards the healthy social development of our communities and our people.
Intravenous Coley laʻau koʻokoʻo lawelawe i kekahi huina 110 manawa, e hoʻomaka ana me 5 manawa i loko o ka hebedoma 1st, 2 manawa i loko o ka hebedoma second-, i ukali ia e 5 manawa i loko o ka hebedoma 3rd a pela aku, e ho’ōla hoʻopau me 1 manawa no pule. High-mahele lāʻau GcMAF (he huina o 48 manawa) mea lawelawe hookahi manawa i ka pule ma ka wā o ka hoʻokahi makahiki.
Old Navy Men’s Blue PullOn Fleece Lined Hooded Ski Windbreaker Jacket, Size S. Heavy, blue hooded windbreaker jacket with black sleeves. The windbreaker has black fleece lining in the body of the jacket, the pockets and the hood.
A great resource for students of traditional Hawaiian dance, this beautiful handbook filled with archival photographs covers the origins, language, etiquette, ceremonies, and the spiritual culture of hula. Hula, the indigenous dance of Hawai’i, preserves significant aspects of Native Hawaiian culture with strong ties to health and spirituality. Kumu Hula, persons who are culturally recognized hula experts and educators, maintain and share this cultural tradition, conveying Hawaiian history and spiritual beliefs in this unique form of cultural and creative expression, comprising specific controlled rhythmic movements that enhance the meaning and poetry of the accompanying songs.
2506 ʻO Mahoehope ke kāne, ʻo Lanihua ka wahine, hānau ke keiki he kōkua nui a waiū nunui. Mahoehope is the husband, Lanihua (Productive-heavenly-one) is the wife; a child born to them is either thick-shouldered or large-busted.
Taunggyi Aungban Ayetharyar Chinshwehaw Hong Pai Hopang Hopong Hseni Hsi Hseng Hsipaw Kalaw Kengtung Kunhing Kunlong Kutkai Kyaukme Kyethi Lai-Hka Langkho Lashio Laukkaing Lawksawk Loilen Mabein Mantong Mawkmai Mong Hpayak Mong Hsat Mong Hsu Mong Khet Mong Kung Mong Nai Mong Pan Mong Ping Mong Ton Mong Yang Mong Yawng Mongko Mongmit Mongyai Muse Nanhkan Namhsan Namtu Nansang Nawnghkio Nyaungshwe Panglong Pekon Pinlaung Tachileik Tangyan
Ua kipa ʻē ʻoukou i ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī a me Ka Papa Loʻi ʻo Kānewai a eia ʻoukou i ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike ʻo Mānoa Heritage i kēia lā. Aia kēia hale a me ka papa loʻi kalo ʻo Kānewai i uka ma Mānoa a aia ka muliwai o Waikīkī i kai ma kahi o ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī (nānā paha i ka palapala ʻāina). ʻAno mamao nā wahi ʻekolu akā pili lākou a pau. No ke aha? Pehea e pili ai?–ka wai (kahe ka wai mai uka a i kai, mai ka papa loʻi kalo a i ka muliwai).
Eia nei kekahi manaʻo Hawaiʻi no Ka ʻĀina Hoʻoulu Lāʻau o Lāiana, ua waiho iho i kekahi mau ʻōlelo noʻeau. Aia nā kāleka ʻōlelo noʻeau i kau ʻia ma ka honua o kēia ʻāina. Waiwai loa nā ʻōlelo noʻeau ke kuanaʻike Hawaiʻi a me ka manaʻo o nā kūpuna no nā haumāna ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi i kēia wā.
The holiday season is officially here and so is our December/January issue! Inside you’ll find a bittersweet look at the final days of Hawai‘i’s sugar industry, a visit with the ancients at Moloka‘i’s Ka Hula Piko Festival, an inside scoop on what scientists at UH Manoa’s Venom Lab are up to and much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
As you know, I love reading!  I am NOT the only one…Like the ʻŌlelo Noeʻau: “Nānā i ke kumu” says…look to the source.  This means to learn from various sources…in this case, letʻs learn about reading from our kumu . Scan the QR codes below to see the V.I.P (Very Important People) on our Keaʻau campus who  love reading!  You may find some great books to help you with genre selection, read some profound thoughts on the book, learn a little more about these V.I.P, AND find that they VALUE reading too!  Being a LIFE-LONG reader is so important!
Keoua’s grandmother tells of stories of how her mother would prepare the pā of the hats each night and it was the children’s kuleana to finish one hat before going out to play each day. This so they could barter for food and fabric to sew dresses. She remembered a Chinese man coming by once a week to purchase hats to send to his brother’s shop in San Francisco.
Drydock is a essential part of the holistic nature of canoe culture. During drydock, learners are exposed to the importance of vessel maintenance. Through drydock programs NKW emphasizes the Hawaiian value of Mālama, to take care of. Most drydock programs center around the mālama (maintenance) of Makaliʻi, our main voyaging vessel. Participants have the opportunity to learn lashing, vessel engineering, and other tasks related to maintaining the sea-going integrity of Makaliʻi. Learners become very familiar with canoe parts and how each part is related to the other parts, a direct reflection of our own community’s make-up.
Immunotherapy i ka hoʻomaka ‘ana ma mākou? Aaieou, mai December 2011, INITIALLY me Regional Hyperthermia, 400 mg / lā Maitake HI-hapa, a Low-mahele lāʻau Naltrexone (LDN). Maitake HI-hapa, a LDN i hoomau loa-makahiki. Coley laʻau koʻokoʻo Inc (Coley toxin ka) i ka hoʻomaka ‘ana ma January 2012 a me High-mahele lāʻau GcMAF (1500 ng, 0.5 ml) like o Feberuari 2012.
Uaʻike wau ua lilo kēia i kekahi o nā ala maʻalahi a me kaʻoluʻolu e hoʻolilo ai i ke kālā i kēia mau lā, e like me nā kānaka me kaʻikeʻole i ka moʻolelo. ʻIke au i kēiaʻoihana maʻalahi, hiki a maʻalahi. Makemake wau e hoʻonui aku i ka manawa me koʻuʻohana a me ke kauʻana me nā hoaaloha, a ke loaʻa nei ka wā no kaʻu mau hana’ē aʻe. ʻOi, nui loa ka uku. ʻAʻohe mea e manaʻo e hanaʻoe ma ka home me kāu uku! Hiki iāʻoe ke loaʻa kēia ola. E hoʻomaka me kēia ma kaomiʻana i kahi.
RATED  Food was awesome one of the best burgers I’ve had. Next time the family and I are on island we will mos def stop by again. We loved the decor and hole atmosphere of the place was right up my wife’s and I ally.
I believe that our kūpuna were visionary when using resources available for the preparation of materials, as well as looking at contemporary and popular styling of the time. While important to be rooted in tradition, I also feel that the practices have become complacent for the sake of maintaining traditions. To draw a greater interest in the young, the practice must evolve in order for the craft to survive.
Eia i ka huikau o ke kaona nei, e noho ana kekahi mau mea, he kāne, a me kāna wahine ma kahi e ō nei ka inoa o Kahehuna, ka heana i hana ‘ia, e pili kokoke ana i ke alanui ‘Ema; iā lāua e noho ana, ua hāpai a hānau ka wahine i kā lāua keiki he kaikamahine. Hānai ihola nā mākua, a ua nui nō ho’i ke kaikamahine, ‘o ka ai aku nō ho’i koe i kāna loa’a, make ihola ka lūau’i makua kāne.
Ma luna o ka puʻu, e kuhi ke kumu i nā wahi pana a me nā kūpuna o ka moʻolelo (Akaka, Nālehuaoakaka, Kauhi ma Waʻahila). E kuhi nō hoʻi i ke ākea o ke awāwa me ka haʻi ʻana i nā haumāna, “E pili ka maka a mahuʻi i nā loʻi i uhi iā lalo o ke awāwa e like me kā Kupuna Maka i wehewehe ai. E kaʻakaʻa ka maka i kēia manawa. ʻOkoʻa i kēia wā, ʻeā?”
“It’s been good because, I got the opportunity before I leave, because Iʻm going off to college in a couple weeks, and my grandma sailed the Hōkūleʻa 16 years ago to Oʻahu, and I got to greet her yesterday, picking her up on the canoe…so it was a good experience.” says Tiana Bala, another haumāna of Nā Pua Noʻeau Lānaʻi.
People go to culinary school to become better chefs; they attend art school to become better artists; they enroll at law school to become better lawyers; we were students at a Hawaiian school to become better Hawaiians.

“pehea keʻano o nā mākaʻi polia”

From my perspective, Dr. Said’s analysis of Orientalism provides a powerful admonition not only for students in the current system of Culture Studies and Gender Studies in the Western academe, but also for all the other social sciences which purport to represent the experience of another.  In a certain sense then, we are all vulnerable to Orientalism, whether in discourse about the psychopathology of a client, the cultural practices of the Saramaka, or the personhood of gendered identities.  Let us therefore commit to mindfulness and nānā pono as we proceed.
Nā Kālai Waʻa offers a series of activities and lessons that help develop individuals as leaders and groups as affective collaborative units. These activities range from trust building excercises to cultural workshops on wahi pana (significance of place), mea noʻeau (work styles and crafts of Hawaiʻi), and pilinakanaka (developing relationships to self and others). Most activities take about an hour and are designed for groups of 10-20 per activity. 
Fast forward about 15 years…I had just graduated from college and joined Halau I Ka Wekiu. Our very first project as a new class was to make a yellow and brown lei hulu. Aunty Paulette actually danced with our Hiwa class in halau, so it was a wonderful to meet her at hula, and then visit her shop and make a lei hulu of my own under her guidance. Aunty Paulette was patient and kind, but she had an eye for perfection. If your lei hulu was inconsistent or had any trouble spots, she did not hesitate to snip your threads and remove inches and hours of hard work.  At the time, of course, this was frustrating, but it was always worth it in the end.  Under Aunty Paulette’s watch you could always create something magnificent.  Aunty Paulette bid this earth farewell last year.  I feel lucky to have made three lei hulu under her tutelage, and we are currently working on a kahili to match our latest lei hulu, that we crafted in Aunty Paulette’s last few weeks with us.  
Hula Preservation Society presents this Hula Kiʻi intensive with Auntie Mauliola Cook, protégé of the late Kumu Nona Beamer. Auntie Nonaʻs practice in this rare form involves puppetry, a means employed in many cultures to pass on and tell stories. Auntie Nona loved the kiʻi, and a favorite Hula Kiʻi in her later years was “Ke Haʻala Puna,” a core chant in the Pele repertoire.*  Join Auntie Mauliola Cook to build your own kiʻi head (using a dried coconut) and lole (muslin outfit to be dyed and designed). The hula taught will be shared at the closing Hōʻike.
We enjoyed a good meal at the cute Hana Hou Restaurant. My teriyaki burger with a hand-made patty and fresh bun was good. The toppings were good but a little messy. I didn’t care for the mayo they put on the burger though. Mayo and teriyaki were not a good combination. Key lime and banana cream pies were both good. Service was okay but it was a little slow because they were tending to some large groups. We loved the aquamarine chairs and the 1950s Hawaiian vibe of the restaurant.
This piece and other fine works of handmade wearable art in 925 Sterling Silver from the Sonny Ching Collection by Paradisus, will be available at the Ho’olau Kanaka Festival on Saturday August 26th at Ke’ehi Lagoon Memorial from 9a-4p. See you there!!
Paulette Kahalepuna recently passed in 2014. This changed Mele’s life completely. With the loss of her mother, Mele was now left with an enormous task. The traditions of her ancestors were in her hands and what a great kuleana (responsibility) this is!
Repost @nowthisnews The amount of trash in the ocean off Honduras is gut-wrenching. Have you guys seen this? I was competing in the 2017 World Freediving Champi…onships in Roatan two months ago!!! @take3forthesea @paulnicklen @justinhofman @greenpeaceap @danmacpherson @endextinctionintl @tpw_foundation @ocean @flightcentreau @seanscottphotography @forrestinwonderland @underwater_explorer #plastic #ocean #breakfast #today #nature #underwater #picoftheday #ocean #bluewater #inspire #inspiration #motivation #wow #water #reality #matrix #dive #diver #paradise #exotic #dreamholiday #perfectworld #video #slowmotion #legs #fitspo #yoga #zen #roatan #honduras
He mau kānaka maʻamau mākou,ʻaʻole mākou e hōʻailona i kā mākou kālā, aiʻole ia eʻai nui i nā pō a pau. Pau mākou i ka hauʻoli a me kā mākou hana. ʻAʻole mākou i hoʻokuʻu i kēiaʻike a hiki i kēia manawa, a ua nui ka pane maikaʻi loa mai ia mea!
#sonnyching #jewlerydesigner #paradisusjewelry #theoriginal #sonnychingbling #sonnychingstyle #sonnychinglife #sccollectionbyparadisus #hina #mahina #fromaculture #moolelo #fashionhawaiian #hawaiianjewelry #jewlery #aotd #model #hawaiimodels #fashionweek #worldfashion #21stcenturyhawaiian #PastToPresent #bringingourcultureintothepresent #manifestingoneofmymanyselves
My Opinion May Differ From Yours. A Difference Of Opinion Doesn’t Mean That The Item Has Been Misrepresented. This Is Exactly What You Will Be Receiving. It Is Impossible To Describe Every Little Detail.
Poke was very classic and showed off the fish, simple elegant the way I like it, they actually have some of the best fish around with their salmon plate which I would not get the kimchi on due to the acid balance. The salmon plate is the way to go. The kalua pork was a too pulled pork style for me, I prefer the kalua pork plate because the bun and sauces combo take away from the pork when you use that as a delivery vehicle.

“pehea e hiki ai iaʻu keʻike i koʻuʻano kālai’āina”

My thought’s is that you should look up to your elders because they have most of the knowledge. They have knowledge because they were on this earth longer than you. They want you to do what they didn’t do correctly. Your family always wants the best for you because they always want you to do well. My family says they always want the best for me. My family helps me because they want me to do great.(Sorry Mrs.Ah Hee I couldn’t get the video on the QR code because we couldn’t update the adobe flash player on my parents phones)
E aloha nā wahine polālele me ka lauohoʻeleʻele i ka Peacock Tattoo maikaʻi me ka hoʻolālāʻikena’ōniuli a me ka pua nani; ua pili kēia pāʻani diapo i ko lākou lauoho a me kaʻili o kaʻili i mea e hoʻohālike ai a nani
He mau kānaka maʻamau mākou,ʻaʻole mākou e hōʻailona i kā mākou kālā, aiʻole ia eʻai nui i nā pō a pau. Pau mākou i ka hauʻoli a me kā mākou hana. ʻAʻole mākou i hoʻokuʻu i kēiaʻike a hiki i kēia manawa, a ua nui ka pane maikaʻi loa mai ia mea!
Urban Panorama gives voice to urban tribes defined by their gritty attitude and colorful graffiti style. It is a well-defined manifesto of denim displayed in infinite variations. It’s a space for those yearning for freedom, with inspiration drawn from biker culture and ethnic influences. The watchword here is layering and mixing shapes, fabrics and styles.
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Repost @nowthisnews The amount of trash in the ocean off Honduras is gut-wrenching. Have you guys seen this? I was competing in the 2017 World Freediving Champi…onships in Roatan two months ago!!! @take3forthesea @paulnicklen @justinhofman @greenpeaceap @danmacpherson @endextinctionintl @tpw_foundation @ocean @flightcentreau @seanscottphotography @forrestinwonderland @underwater_explorer #plastic #ocean #breakfast #today #nature #underwater #picoftheday #ocean #bluewater #inspire #inspiration #motivation #wow #water #reality #matrix #dive #diver #paradise #exotic #dreamholiday #perfectworld #video #slowmotion #legs #fitspo #yoga #zen #roatan #honduras
Congratulations to HUGS board member Bill Tobin, owner/managing partner of Tiki’s Grill & Bar, who was inducted into the Hawaii Restaurant Association’s Hall of… Fame last night at Pōmaika’i Ballrooms. He was one of 10 restaurateurs, chefs and industry pioneers who have contributed to Hawaii’s culinary scene. Hats off also to HUGS board member Anne Lee who chaired the Gala, that featured a delicious Chefs of Aloha Dine Around.
Robert Uluwehi Cazimero, the gentlemen of Hālau Nā Kamalei o Līlīlehua, Kealiʻi Reichel, his hui hoʻokani, and some of the ladies from Hālau Keʻalaokamaile will be featured throughout the concert. Uluwehi and Kealiʻi will also join with the Lei ʻĀpiki of HMI to create some magical moments and collaborate on a few hula.
Congratulations Hana Hou 18U team, they are in the 2018 Aloha Region Power League Tournament!  It was a nail-biting, exciting match, and the ladies played their hearts out. They won the second set in an on-the-edge-of-your-seat 32-30 victory.  In the third set, they fought back to come from behind and win 15-13.  Awesome job ladies, and love the “we will not give up” 
Nā Pono Lawaiʻa—Hoʻomanaʻo ʻoukou i nā pono lawaiʻa i nānā ʻia ma ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī? He aha nā mea e pono ai ka hana ʻana i nā pono lawaiʻa? Pono nā lāʻau o ka ʻāina a me nā iʻa o ke kai (ke kīholo, ka ʻupena, a pēlā aku). No laila, pili ka ʻāina a me ka kai, ʻeā? Ma hea e ulu ai nā lāʻau e laʻa ka ʻōhiʻa lehua a me ke kauila? I uka nei. E ʻikemaka ʻoukou i kēia mau lāʻau ma ʻaneʻi i kēia lā.
10. n. the “leading god among the great gods” (HM 42); a god of creation and the ancestor of chiefs and commoners; a god of sunlight, fresh water, and forests (Thrum, p. 82) to whom no human sacrifices were made. In prayers to Kāne (HM 53-55) his name is followed by more than seventy epithets. Kanaloa was his constant companion, but Kāne’s name always preceded. Twelve sacred paradisic islands lay off the Hawaiian group “within easy reach,” visible on the distant horizon at sunrise and sunset. One is Kāne-hūnā-moku (Kāne hidden island) where Kāne and Kanaloa lived. (HM 67) The twenty-seventh night of the lunar month was sacred to Kāne. see UL 257-259 for a famous chant to Kāne. lit., male.
~Men’s Old Navy lighweight windbreaker zip front jacket. ~Red mesh lining. ~Front pockets and one chest pocket all have zipper closures. ~Lining: 100% polyester. ~Shell coating: 100% polyurethane. ~Base fabric: 100% nylon.
Ch.33 p.177 para.3 sent.2 A mōlehulehu, hiki akula lākou i Honokalani, a laila, hoʻouna akula ʻo Lāʻielohelohe i ke kamaʻāina e hele aku e nānā i ka noho ʻana o nā aliʻi. and at dusk reached Honokalani; there Laielohelohe sent the natives to see where the chiefs were staying.
Huhū nō ‘o Leialoha. Ua ‘imi aku ka wahine moloā iā Kalei. Aia ‘o Kalei i loko o kona hale. Ua ‘uā ‘o Leialoha iā ia, “E aha ana ‘oe? He aha kou pilikia?” Ua ‘aka‘aka wale ‘o Kalei a ‘ōlelo mai ‘o ia, “He u‘i lolena kū i ki‘ona!”
Throughout the week that Hōkūleʻa was docked in Mānele Bay, community members of Lānaʻi and visitors alike were encouraged to visit the canoe, take tours, and learn about the vessel and its upcoming worldwide mission. One of the student groups that joined in were the haumāna of Nā Pua Noʻeau Lānaʻi.
Very Nice Windbreaker Pullover Jacket. Drawstring attached Hood. Measures approx: 29″ Length – 52″ Chest measuring around at armpits. 11″ Zipper at neckline with Velcro – 2 side pockets – 1 Front zippered pocket – Elastic cuffs – Hemline with drawcord.
All reviews pies cream pie grilled cheese pulled pork macadamia nut chicken cole slaw loco moco teriyaki burger bread rice lilikoi potatoes portuguese sausage fresh fish mahi mahi south point green sand beach
Ka iniiaiie kauka ua kāhāhā No ka mea, o ka hopena i manaoia mai ka hoʻomāka Inc i ka alawa maʻi kumupaʻa (ma mua hoʻi o ka laau) No ka mea, o ka holomua ke kahua. Naʻe, i kaʻeho nalowale loa E kāhea aku i kekahi me ka makaʻu no’aʻaʻa koe i loko o nā maʻiʻaʻai wale.
Eha mau malama i pule ole ai, no ka oihana o ka makahiki, he mau pule no nae e pili ana i ka oihana o ka makahiki, ma ka malama o Mahoehope e pau ai ka haipule ana, a na mea a pau, a koe o ka kahu akua wale no ke haipule mau.
#sonnyching #sonnychingcollection #sccollection #sonnychingstyle #sonnychingcollectionbyparadisus #sonnychingbling #paradisusjewelry #theoriginal #sterlingsilver #silver #hawaiianjewelry #hawaiian #ohekapala #kakau #fromaculture #culturallyinspired #style #jewelry #aotd #mahiole #nahulualii #mm2017 #merriemonarch2017 #jewlerydesign #alii #mana #accessories #fromaculture #pasttopresent
He pono ole no kekahi AEIU (exe) ma Rikoooo e e ao ia e kekahi Anati-mea hoʻomaʻi polokalamu like palena papaha iho mailoko o. Mua mai panic, oe i ke ike nei au aia i loa Ua he hookahi mea hoʻomaʻi ma Rikoooo mai kona hanaia’na (oi ma mua o 12 makahiki). I mea, keia ua kapaia he wahahee maikaʻi, ʻike hou aku maʻaneʻi
1  ¶  E mililani aku iā Iēhova, e kāhea aku hoʻi i kona inoa;     E hōʻike aku hoʻi i kāna mau hana i waena o nā kānaka. 2 E ʻoli aku iā ia, e hoʻoleʻa aku iā ia;     E hoʻokaulana aku i kāna mau hana a pau. 3 E kaena ʻoukou ma kona inoa hoʻāno,     E leʻaleʻa hoʻi ka naʻau o ka poʻe ʻimi iā Iēhova. 4 E huli ʻoukou iā Iēhova, a me kona ikaika;     E ʻimi mau loa aku hoʻi i kona maka. 5 E hoʻomanaʻo i nā hana mana āna i hana ai,     A me kāna mau mea kupanaha,     A me ka hoʻoponopono ʻana o kona waha: 6 E nā pua a ʻAberahama, a kāna kauwā,     E nā mamo a Iakoba, kona mea i wae ai. 7 ʻO ia nō ʻo Iēhova, ko kākou Akua:     Aia ma ka honua a pau kāna hoʻoponopono ʻana. 8  ¶  Ua hoʻomanaʻo mau mai ʻo ia i kona berita,     I ka ʻōlelo hoʻi āna i kauoha mai ai i nā hanauna, he tausani;
I was lucky enough to try the teriyaki bowl at the red bull races. A few weeks later, again I had the teriyaki bowl, it’s was outstanding, same as the first time  I tried it. I also had the pork, wow, great flavor, but what I thought was the best is the mahi. The way it just melted in my mouth, outstanding, I would recomend this gourmet truck to everyone

“pehea ka nui o nā mea hana hana ma india”

Ch.5 p.31 para.7 sent.1 Holo akula kā lākou nei a kau i Honokaʻope ma Waipiʻo, ma laila aku a waho o Pāʻauhau, nānā aʻela lākou, e kū ana ka ʻeʻa o ka lepo o uka. They sailed and touched at Honokaape at Waipio, then came off Paauhau and saw a cloud of dust rising landward.
NKW also offers workshops and presentations on non-instrument navigation and way-finding. During these workshops, learners are introduced to the star compass, the one used by Papa Mau Piailug as well as the one adapted by Nainoa Thompson and the Polynesian Voyaging Society. They are also introduced to the four major starlines used in Hawaiian navigation and the elements used for navigation.
1  ¶  E mililani aku iā Iēhova, e kāhea aku hoʻi i kona inoa;     E hōʻike aku hoʻi i kāna mau hana i waena o nā kānaka. 2 E ʻoli aku iā ia, e hoʻoleʻa aku iā ia;     E hoʻokaulana aku i kāna mau hana a pau. 3 E kaena ʻoukou ma kona inoa hoʻāno,     E leʻaleʻa hoʻi ka naʻau o ka poʻe ʻimi iā Iēhova. 4 E huli ʻoukou iā Iēhova, a me kona ikaika;     E ʻimi mau loa aku hoʻi i kona maka. 5 E hoʻomanaʻo i nā hana mana āna i hana ai,     A me kāna mau mea kupanaha,     A me ka hoʻoponopono ʻana o kona waha: 6 E nā pua a ʻAberahama, a kāna kauwā,     E nā mamo a Iakoba, kona mea i wae ai. 7 ʻO ia nō ʻo Iēhova, ko kākou Akua:     Aia ma ka honua a pau kāna hoʻoponopono ʻana. 8  ¶  Ua hoʻomanaʻo mau mai ʻo ia i kona berita,     I ka ʻōlelo hoʻi āna i kauoha mai ai i nā hanauna, he tausani;
Kiara Puakenamu Leong was the valedictorian of the Kamehameha Schools Kapālama Campus Class of 2006. A fifth-year Hawaiian language student, Puakenamu is set to pursue a degree in Anthropology at Scripps College in Claremont, California. She exemplifies a student who, in her own words, strives to achieve “the best of both worlds” – excellence in scholarship and an appreciation and understanding of nā mea Hawai‘i. She gave the following speech during commencement ceremonies on May 28, 2006, speaking first ma ka ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i and then ma ka ‘ōlelo haole. Puakenamu’s message was clear — as beneficiaries of Pauahi’s legacy, Kamehameha graduates have an even greater kuleana to in turn give back to the larger Native Hawaiian community Pauahi wished to serve.
Our August/September issue has arrived! Inside you’ll hear from incredible women taking on the world of big wave surfing, travel through the striking landscapes of Ka Lae, get a behind the scenes look at the company throwing many of Hawai‘i’s biggest lu‘au and much, much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
Makaʻāinana organized in many ways. They signed petitions, organized large public meetings, solicited assistance from Hawaiian and American politicians, composed songs, and published newspaper editorials. In 1897, makaʻāinana helped collect more than 21,000 signatures on a petition protesting annexation. On November 20, 1898, four delegates hand carried the petitions to Washington, D.C. They met with senators and congressmen and voiced the concerns of the Hawaiian people. This historic document, called the 1897 Kūʻē Petitions, is housed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. There is also a copy at the Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi.
Looking to the source of a living Hawaiian cultural identity links us to the purposes of traditional knowledge, behavior, spirituality and language, that are the basic principles directing the Hawaiian language revitalization program of the Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language Consortium at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. This alliance consists of school programs from infant-toddler, preschool, elementary, intermediate, high school, university and the ʻImiloa Astronomy Center.
Please read the About page for more information on the rationale for nānā pono and on the process I propose for all of us as we develop a respectful relationship with one another even as we wrestle with the material to come.
I love Na Lima Mili Hulu Noeau.  I have been taking lei hulu (feather lei) classes in California for years and have been hearing about Aunty Paulette and Aunty Mary Lou all this time.  I had the privilege of meeting Aunty Mary Lou a couple of years ago.  She showed us around the shop, “talking story” with us about family and could identify the maker of each lei she had in her shop, taking particular care to point out the intricate stitch work.  Time flew by and we didn’t actually get a chance for a lesson, but we must have been there for at least a couple of hours anyway!  
Iā Kauhi e iho ana i kai, lohe ʻia aʻela ʻo ia i ke oli ʻana mai o Kahalaopuna ma hope ona. Pēlā ʻo ia i ʻike ai, ua ola hou ʻo Kahalaopuna. No laila, piʻi hou aʻela ʻo ia i uka no ka pepehi hou ʻana i kāna wahine uʻi. Ua hili hou akula ʻo ia i ke poʻo o Kahalaopuna i ka ʻāhui hala a make. Kanu hou ihola ʻia kona kino i ka lepo a haʻalele akula iā Mānoa. Hoʻōla hou ihola ke akua pueo iā Kahalaopuna i ka hoʻi ʻana o Kauhi i kai. A oli hou akula ʻo Kahalaopuna i ke mele no Kauhi.
Therefore, when I hear the phrase Nānā i ke kumu, I know I must consider my emotional sense of place as well as my intellectual honesty and reasoning. In this regard, I am no different from most within our Hawai‘i communities, whether they be keiki o ka ‘āina, kama‘āina, or malihini. Each person has a connection to this place; all have deliberately chosen to be here.
He aha ka meaʻoi aku ma mua o ka ukuʻana i ka uku no nā haleʻaina kaulana? Uaʻike wau e pili ana i ka poʻe e kūʻai kālā ana ma ka pūnaewele akāʻaʻole au i manaʻo e hiki nō hoʻi iaʻu no kaʻu nohoʻana ma Asia. ʻO kahi maikaʻi koʻu ho’āʻoʻana i kāu ho’āʻo a kau inoaʻana, i kēia manawa, loaʻa iaʻu nā hana hebedoma mai nā hale likeʻole e makemake ana iaʻu e nānā i kā lākou mau mea kaulana! Ua lele au i Bangkok a me Singapore i nā uku a pau i ukuʻia no kahiʻahaʻainaʻai aʻu i uhi ai. ʻO kaʻu mea e’ōlelo aku nei he mahalo iāʻoe aʻoi aku ka mana iāʻoe!
Pili ka ʻāina mai uka a i kai a pili nō hoʻi ka ʻāina a me ke kai ma muli o ke kahe ʻana mai o ka wai, no laila, pili ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike ʻo Mānoa Heritage me Ka Papa Loʻi ʻo Kānewai a me ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī.
Hey Oahu people don’t forget, fashion show this Sunday! Kahala Mall at 1:00p and then trunk show @richeskahala to follow. There the entire Sonny Ching Collection will have a special discount. And one-of-a-kind and limited edition pieces featured in the fashion show will be for sale. #nottobemissed #sonnychingcollection #hoololi #paradisusjewelry #happyholiday #seeyouthere
To summarize this story: a Honolulu couple marries and has a daughter – Helena Kalanilehua – who grows into an intelligent, beautiful young woman. Helena’s father dies, and her mother finds a new partner – Hōlanikū – who secretly forces himself on Helena. Helena, in the meantime, is being courted by Ioane Kaahai, a young man whose impressive wit and appearance complement Helena’s own highly desirable ‘ano. Hōlanikū notices their flirtatious behavior, becomes jealous, and disguises his lili fatherly concern for his step-daughter’s virtue. When he is called away to Hawai’i Island to tend to the affairs of his ailing older brother, Hōlanikū admonishes his wife and mother to keep careful watch over their young beauty. Helena and Ioane, however, immediately conspire to consummate their relationship. He climbs into her window, they spend the night together, and their apparent success at clandestine love results in their “heepuewai i na manawa a pau a hiki i ka hoi ana mai o ka makua kane pauaka” (repeated trysting until the return of the deviant father).
‘O ‘Ōhi’a ka lua o nā hua’ōlelo i koho ‘ia no ua po’oinoa lā. ‘Eā, he nui kona mau mana’o. Ma kēia kolamu na’e e hō’ike ai i kekahi mana’o e pili ana i ke kumu ‘ōhi’a lehua. He kumu lā’au ia nona ka lā’au pa’a a nona pū ka pua ‘ula’ula ‘o ka Lehua. I ke au i kūnewa aku nei, ua kapa ‘ia ke koa ikaika a mākaha he Lehua ma muli o ka like o kona kūpa’a me ko ka ‘ōhi’a lehua. Ma kēia kolamu, ‘o ka Haku ‘Ōhi’a ke kanaka nona ka na’au ikaika kūpa’a e like me ko kākou mau koa Hawai’i.
Bio: Kawika Lum, born 1976, is a hulu (feather) artist from Pūpūkea, Oʻahu. He started learning lei hulu from Paulette Kahalepuna in 1997 at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. While at the Univeristy of Hawaiʻi, he studied Natural Enviroment and Fiber Arts within the Hawaiian Studies program, and graduated with a Bachelors of Arts in 2001. Kawika’s fiber arts teacher at the university was 2013 MAMo Awardee, Maile Andrade.
If you do wish to paddle, the paddling fee is only $10 for four sessions – an absolute bargain. The $10 per month paddling fee includes one paddling session each week (four paddling sessions per month) in clean, safe outrigger canoes – plus paddling tips and instruction. We strive to make it fun and safe for everyone. The paddling fee also includes use of a paddle and on-board canoe safety equipment.
E mākaʻikaʻi ʻelua hui liʻiliʻi a puni ka hale a me ka heiau. I ka mākaʻikaʻi ʻana, e lohe ʻia ʻelua moʻolelo no Mānoa (1—Kahalaopuna; 2—Kawelo me ka heiau ʻo Kūkaʻōʻō). A laila, e haku nā haumāna i hōʻikeʻike no nā moʻolelo ʻelua.
symptoms:Kanikani’āʻula, bladder nā mea palahēhē i kiaʻi i 10 manawa no ka po, optic neuritis (li nui o ka optic nā aʻalolo) Ke hoohiolo nei, loa Muscleʻeha a me ka twitching, ka hilahila, nawaliwali, noho huila e paa ana, hiki ole ke hele paha ku. Lehulehu o ka mea koʻohune nā mea palahēhē.
Rare CHRISTMAS in Hawaii Mele Kalikimaka (Ron Anderson Collection by Kahala) Aloha Hawaiian Shirt. Ron Anderson collection by Kahala. Mele Kalikimaka (Merry Christmas) Collectible Aloha Shirt. Excellent Christmas in Hawaii theme, Santa Claus on beach with hula dancers, surfboards, palm trees, Christmas trees, flowers, beach etc.
Salt Liko will be showcasing their new collection, Makani. New patterns and colors are incorporated into the breezy cuts of past lines…all too perfect for the laid-back, urban lifestyle of Hawaii. Joining Salt Liko’s booth is Matt Bruening. Look out for new prints and more from the popular label.

“pehea e loaʻa ai i mea hoʻolimalima kiʻi no ka Noelima”

Literally translated, Nānā i ke kumu means ‘look to your source’ recognizing an inner wellspring inside each and every one of us. We look within, and self reflect to get healthy, in body, mind and spirit. This is one’s wellspring of identity and intuition, intellect and emotion, values and beliefs, lessons learned and ancestral knowledge, all personal and professional alike.
Ch.6 p.35 para.7 sent.2 Nānā akula lākou, e kū mai ana nō nā hale o Kauakahialiʻi mā; e heʻe nalu mai ana nō hoʻi nā kamaʻāina. and saw Kauakahialii’s houses standing there and the people of the place out surf riding.
The stories we tell—from the clients we work with to the questions we ask—are shaped by our aspiration to revitalize and affirm a positive native Hawaiian world view. We work to create a new narrative of the modern Hawaiian experience.
Come as often or as infrequently as you wish. We don’t take attendance. You’ll always be welcomed even if you can only make it every once in a while. Please don’t ever feel as though you are locked-in to weekly attendance or that you can’t come back if you haven’t been able to come for several weeks (or months). We all have busy schedules and we understand completely if you can only be an “every now and again” member.
Kūkulu hou ʻia ka heiau e Billy Fields.  Ma mua he heiau i hoʻomana ʻia no ka ulu kalo a me ka lako o ka ʻāina.  He kalo wale nō ka ʻāina ma mua a laila ka laiki, a laila ka poʻe hānai pipi.  I heiau ʻo Kūkaʻōʻō e kupu pono ai ka ʻāina.  He hoʻokupu.  Kupu ka ʻāina i ka wai…he ua, he wai kahe, he wai o ka ʻāina.
Although this story is not as satisfying in content or resolution as is Kīlau Pali’s previously published “Ke Mele a me ke Kaona o ia Mele i Haku ‘Ia” (Kuokoa, October 9, 1922; Kaleinaman: E Kū i ka Hoe Uli, v.3, Summer 2004), it is still of considerable interest to students of “‘ōlelo ‘ano lua” and the hoʻāeae: the story frequently employs language of the highest and most poetic sort; it gives the ho’āeae chant-form a specific social and historical context; it offers a glimpse into the manner in which the skills of a 19th century master chanter were engaged; and it encourages a redefinition of the ho’āeae as a distinct genre of poetry – and not simply as a set of vocal qualities with which an oli is delivered.
Nana i Ke Kumu is a very wise saying. It tells us that we need to pay attention and be present. If we don’t pay attention, how will we learn? Pay attention to anything that can help you gain knowledge, like a book, a person or a video. It tells us that learning is not done only through ourselves, but through others who love and care for us and through things we see, read and do. There was a time when I was paying no attention to the teacher and I had no idea what was happening, and I got totally lost in the lesson. I learned nothing, but to pay attention.
Ua kipa ʻē ʻoukou i ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī a me Ka Papa Loʻi ʻo Kānewai a eia ʻoukou i ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike ʻo Mānoa Heritage i kēia lā. Aia kēia hale a me ka papa loʻi kalo ʻo Kānewai i uka ma Mānoa a aia ka muliwai o Waikīkī i kai ma kahi o ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī (nānā paha i ka palapala ʻāina). ʻAno mamao nā wahi ʻekolu akā pili lākou a pau. No ke aha? Pehea e pili ai?–ka wai (kahe ka wai mai uka a i kai, mai ka papa loʻi kalo a i ka muliwai).
People of Luova gave the voyagers a hearty Solomon style welcome, with dozens of residents turning out to help pull the massive canoe up from the beach to shelter. Children eagerly clambered over the hull to explore, and some older people fondly recalled earlier visits by tepuke during the decades when these canoes regularly plied Temotu’s waters.
2017 – 2018 STUDENT REGISTRATION: Participants should complete and return a Student Registration Form to the Na Pua No’eau office on your island. Participants are required to register annually to update mailing address, contact information and emergency & medical data. A completed registration form will put you on our mailing list to receive anouncements of upcoming events mailed directly to you.
‘O kēia mau lālani mele ma luna a’e, e hō’ike mai ana nō ia mau lālani mele, i ka no’eau kūli’u a me ka loea o ka mea nāna i haku, a na ka mo’olelo i hana ‘ia e nā mea kino ‘ehā (4), na ia mau mea e hō’oia’i’o mai, i nā hua ‘ōlelo o ke mele, a ‘o ke kumu ho’i o ke mele i haku ‘ia, i kapa ‘ia he kaona no ia mele. Penei ka mo’olelo i puka ai kēia mele:
Today the International Union for the Conservation of Nature opens its ten-day World Conservation Congress in Honolulu. Also, President Obama has arrived in part to share the news about the expansion of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and to visit Kuaihelani, a.k.a, Midway Atoll, to experience its incredible natural abundance.
Eia paha nā nīnau e nīnau ai i nā haumāna ma hope o kā lākou hōʻikeʻike i moākāka loa ka moʻolelo iā kākou a pau a i paʻa pono nā manaʻo nui (moʻokūʻauhau, haʻi moʻolelo, maiau, maʻemaʻe, wai, pilina o ke kanaka me ka ʻāina).
Ch.24 p.126 para.9 sent.2 A hiki maila ua moʻo nui nei, ʻōlelo akula ʻo Kahalaomāpuana, “I kiʻi ʻia aku nei ʻoe e lawe aʻe ʻoe iā mākou i kai o Keaʻau e nānā mākou i ka lā hoʻokahakaha o Kekalukaluokēwā. When the lizard came, Kahalaomapuana said, “You have been summoned to take us down to the sea at Keaau to see Kekalukaluokewa’s wedding feast.
Ch.13 p.69 para.4 sent.1 Iā Hauaʻiliki mā i hiki aku ai, aia hoʻi, ua nui nā mea i hele mai e nānā no kēia keiki ʻoi kelakela o ka maikaʻi ma mua o Kauakahialiʻi a me ʻAiwohikupua, a he mea mahalo nui loa ia na nā kamaʻāina o Keaʻau. When Hauailiki’s party arrived, behold many persons came to see this youth who rivaled Kauakahialii and Aiwohikupua in beauty, and all the people of Keaau praised him exceedingly.
When Hōlanikū returns to Honolulu, he learns of Helena’s affair from his mother who has, until now, said nothing about what she’s seen through Helena’s open window. Hōlanikū then blames his wife for Helena’s immorality, disclaims all responsibility for his stepdaughter’s “hewa,” and brazenly attempts to renew his secret relationship with the girl. When Helena rejects him, he goes to a poet and commissions a mele ho’āeae that, he hopes, will soothe his anguish and win her affection.
I am using this and Vol 1 as reference as write a fiction novel which includes reference to old Hawaii traditions. This is one of books recommended by native academics for reliability, as I try to write a piece that might also be enjoyed by Big Island natives as well as euro-American-haoles.
Hōʻike maila ʻo Kumu Pila Wilson i ka pilina paʻa ma waena o ko Hawaiʻi me ko Iāpana.  ʻO kekahi mau manaʻo nui, ʻo ia hoʻi ke komoneʻe ʻana o nā kānaka mahi kō mai Iāpana mai i Hawaiʻi nei, a me ka wā kamaliʻi o Kenekoa Inouye, ʻo ia hoʻi kona wā i noho pū ai me kekahi ʻohana Hawaiʻi.  Wehewehe maila nō hoʻi ʻo ia nei no ka nui o ko Kenekoa Inouye kākoʻo ʻana ma ka hoʻokumu ʻana i ka papahana ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, iā Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani hoʻi, pēlā nō no kona kūpaʻa mau ʻana ma hope o nā lāhui ʻōiwi o ʻAmelika i kona paio ʻana no ke kānāwai Native Hawaiian Education Act o ka makahiki 1988 a me ke kānāwai Native American Languages Act o ka makahiki 1990.

“kahi e hiki ai iaʻu ke kūʻai aku i ka papa hana”

In 2009, a railway link through to Jiegao in China was proposed. In 2011 the proposal was expanded to a link between Kunming and Kyaukphyu. President Thein Sein’s signed a memorandum of understanding during his May 2011 visit to Beijing between Myanmar’s rail transport ministry and China’s state-owned Railway Engineering Corporation to build the railway.[7]
Ch.21 p.108 para.3 sent.4 I ka mao ʻana aʻe o ka noe, aia ʻekolu poʻe e lana ana ma kūlana nalu e kū ana, a he mea haʻohaʻo ia iā uka i ka nānā aku. When the mist cleared three persons floated on the crest of the wave, and this was a surprise to the onlookers.
Ch.17 p.85 para.1 sent.2 I nānā iho ka hana o ua ʻo ʻUlili mā i ke a lalo o ua moʻo nei e ʻeku ana i ka honua me he ʻōʻō palau lā, a laila, he mea weliweli iā lāua i ka nānā aku, maopopo ihola iā lāua, ua pau ko lākou poʻe kānaka i ka make. Snipe and his companion looked down at the lower jaw of the lizard plowing the earth like a shovel, and it was a fearful thing to see. It was plain their fellows must all be dead,
Ch.6 p.33 para.3 sent.2 A nānā akula, ʻaʻole he mau waʻa holo mai, no laila, nīnau akula ka poʻe me ia, “ʻAuhea hoʻi nā waʻa āu i ʻōlelo mai nei he mau waʻa aliʻi?” but could see no canoe coming. Then the people with him asked, “Where is the canoe which you said was a chief’s canoe coming? ”
Kūkākūkā akula ʻo Uʻilani Chong (ka wahine ʻekolu mai ka hema aku), ʻo ʻAnakē Uʻi hoʻi wahi a kona mau hoapapa i kapa aku ai iā ia, me kona mau hoa no kēia mea ʻo ka mauli ola Hawaiʻi a me ka welo i ʻike ʻia ma nā kānaka e hoʻōla ana i ka moʻomeheu Hawaiʻi.  He mea koʻikoʻi nō ka ʻike leʻa o nā ʻelele pākahi a pau no ko lākou pikoʻu iho ma mua o ka puka ʻana aku i ke ao holoʻokoʻa.  ʻO Alohilani Maiava, Uʻilani Ige, a me Kawehi Lopez nā lālā ʻē aʻe o ko ʻAnakē Uʻi pūʻulu.
1  ¶  E mililani aku iā Iēhova, e kāhea aku hoʻi i kona inoa;     E hōʻike aku hoʻi i kāna mau hana i waena o nā kānaka. 2 E ʻoli aku iā ia, e hoʻoleʻa aku iā ia;     E hoʻokaulana aku i kāna mau hana a pau. 3 E kaena ʻoukou ma kona inoa hoʻāno,     E leʻaleʻa hoʻi ka naʻau o ka poʻe ʻimi iā Iēhova. 4 E huli ʻoukou iā Iēhova, a me kona ikaika;     E ʻimi mau loa aku hoʻi i kona maka. 5 E hoʻomanaʻo i nā hana mana āna i hana ai,     A me kāna mau mea kupanaha,     A me ka hoʻoponopono ʻana o kona waha: 6 E nā pua a ʻAberahama, a kāna kauwā,     E nā mamo a Iakoba, kona mea i wae ai. 7 ʻO ia nō ʻo Iēhova, ko kākou Akua:     Aia ma ka honua a pau kāna hoʻoponopono ʻana. 8  ¶  Ua hoʻomanaʻo mau mai ʻo ia i kona berita,     I ka ʻōlelo hoʻi āna i kauoha mai ai i nā hanauna, he tausani;
Another reason this journey is especially significant is because we are traveling on the sea of the deity Kāne; going to a piko, or focal point, of the deity Wākea; and forging on through the sea of the deity Kanaloa. When we were on Hawaiʻi island (referred to as the island of Chief Keawe) we visited the “piko o Wākea” atop Mauna Kea which also known as “mauna a Wākea”. On our journey to Tahiti, we will visit the “piko o Wākea” at sea (which is also the equator). We will take as an offering some of the water retrieved from the “piko o Wākea” atop Mauna Kea to this “piko o Wākea” at sea. We will do so at the “time of Wākea”, known in Hawaiian as “a-wakea” or “awakea”, which is the noonday hour. The waʻa will stop at the “piko o Wākea”, a very sacred place between the “black glistening path of Kāne”[i] to the north; the “black glistening path of Kanaloa”[ii] to the south; the “sacred red path of Kāne”[iii] to the east; and the “sacred faint red path of Kanaloa”[iv] to the west. It will be an important ceremony for us as we remember and honor these deities, guardians, and ancestors of ours. As our ancestors live on through us, we too as a people will thrive and endure.
I have been on three long voyages prior to this: from Hawaiʻi to Micronesia, Palmyra to Hawaiʻi, and Aotearoa to Tahiti. Some were hot, some cold, some wet and damp, but all of them were amazing journeys. This particular voyage however is one that I am truly passionate about. We will sail on double-hulled vessels as our ancestors did, watch the same swells as our ancestors, study the same stars, be embraced by the same winds, watch the same sun, and most importantly as with all journeys prior to this, we are travelling on the very same path as our ancestors did before us, on the ocean pathway from Hawaiʻi to Tahiti. This will be Hōkūleʻa’s sixth trip to Tahiti and it will be another great accomplishment for all of us on these waʻa today. But we do so remembering our ancestors who set the course for us long ago: Papa, Kaʻulu, Hema, Kahaʻiahema, Paumakua, Mōʻīkeha and ʻOlopana, and the like.
Bio: Moses Goods is one of Hawaiʻi’s most prominent theatre artists. Originally from the island of Maui and now based in Honolulu he has traveled nationally and internationally performing his original work to a wide range of audiences. His body of work ranges from full length plays to theatrical storytelling pieces most of which are strongly rooted in Native Hawaiian culture.
Apparel for men from Banana Republic is expertly manufactured from only top quality fabric. You count on these men’s clothes in the boardroom, barroom and while rough-housing with your young family members. This selection is as durable as it is fashionable. You’ll enjoy looking great well into the night in amazing clothing that won’t let you down. From soft, breathable shirts that will keep you cool when the pressure mounts at work, to warm outerwear that will keep you comfortable when the temperature outside drops, you’ll get through your day in style with this stellar collection.
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Hō‘ea lākou i ke kahakai ‘o Waimea a lele nā keiki kāne i ke ka‘a. Holo nā keiki kāne i ka moana. Kāhea ‘o Pāpā, “E kali ‘oukou!” Huli hope nā keiki kāne. Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā lākou, “E kokua mai.” Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā Kawika, “E lawe ‘oe i ka ‘aina awakea.” Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā Micah, “E lawe ‘oe i nā kāwele.” Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā Makana, “E lawe ‘oe i nā papa he‘e nalu.” ‘Ōlelo ‘o Pāpā, “E lawe au i nā mea inu.”
When I moved from O‘ahu to Hawai‘i Island, I had the privilege of attending classes taught by the late Dr. George Kanahele, highly respected scholar and civic leader of the Hawaiian renaissance of the 1970s whose Ho‘ohana at the time of these classes—the early 1990s—was within the field of organizational consulting.
E like me ka wehe ʻana o ka hālāwai, pēlā nō ke pani ʻana, ma ke mele, alu lākou ma ka hula ʻauana ʻana i kekahi hula no ka Mōʻī Kāwika Kalākaua, kekahi meʻe nui ma ka hoʻōla ʻana i nā ʻano pāhiahia like ʻole o Hawaiʻi.  ʻOi aʻela ka pīhoihoi o nā haumāna i kēia hui ʻana no nā hanana e hiki mai ana!
The Hawaiian Islands are home to countless incredible restaurants, many of which are found in the islands’ capital city and other large towns. But that doesn’t mean that the lesser-known restaurants found way out in the Hawaiian countryside are any less delicious. In fact, there’s one little eatery found off the beaten path that might just serve the best food you’ve tried in ages. Located in the southernmost town in the United States
E nānā kō kākou maka ma ka ʻāluna ahiahi o ka lā 29 o Nowemapa, he ʻauinalā kēia i helu pō ʻia he hopena o Mauli (ma ke ʻano o ka helu pō o ke kuhi ʻana i ka pō ʻo Hilo ma ka lā e koho ʻia ai ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana o ka mahina puāhilo, ʻaʻole wale nō ma ke ʻano o ka helu pō mai ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana o ka mahina puāhilo), a he ahiahi i helu pō ʻia he maka o Muku. Koho ʻia ka napoʻo ʻana o ka lā ma kahi o ka manawa hola 5:48 a me ka napoʻo ʻana o ka mahina ma kahi o ka manawa hola 7:25. ʻAno pōkole kēia manawa, he 37 minuke wale nō, ma waena o ka napoʻo ʻana o ka lā a me ka napoʻo ʻana o ka mahina (aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/RS_OneDay.php). Ua koho ʻo Shaukat Kāne ma moonsighting.com i ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana paha o ka mahina puāhilo inā loaʻa mua ma ka ʻohe nānā ma Hawaiʻi ma kēia lā 29 o Nowemapa (http://moonsighting.com/visibilitycurves/1438rba_11-29-2016.gif), akā kokoke ka pae ʻāina ʻo Hawaiʻi i kahi o ka ʻike maka ʻia ʻana ma ka ʻohe nānā wale nō).
“I’m here because I believe in women’s rights, reproductive rights,” said protestor Dayna Puckett, “I believe in a woman’s right to choose and I believe that nobody can tell us what to do with our own bodies.”
Inā he mau nīnau hou kāu ma mua o ka hoʻomakaʻana, ke noi aku nei mākou iāʻoe e heluhelu i nā nīnau pinepine , e hōʻike lākou iāʻoe i nā mea a pau āu eʻike ai! Kaomi i kēia no ka nānāʻana iā lākou A e kaomiʻana i lalo e kūkākūkā me kahi mea kūʻai mea ola e kohoʻia.
afir ap’nā ap’né apan Babu bahut bāp-ké Basti beat began Benares Bengali Bés beta Bhagalpur bhai Bhatri Bhojpuri BHOJPURI DIALECT BIHARI brother Calcutta Champaran character Chhattisgarhi chhi consonant Cuckoo Cuttack Darbhanga dhan dialect District EASTERN GROUP Eastern Hindi Eastern Magahi father first genitive ghar Gorakhpur Grammar Ham”rā hamar him-to India INDO-ARYAN FAMILY Jashpur kah”lak kaili Kaithi kari khusi kuchh language letter Magahi MAGAHI DIALECT Maithili Manbhum me-to Monghyr Muzaffarpur my-own nahi niman nouns number of speakers O-kar oblique form ok”rā Oriyā Palamau Parganas Plur plural pronounced Provinces Purnea rahal rahé Ranchi sabh Saran Shahabad Sing Singh speak spoken Standard Bhojpuri Standard Maithili stra SUB-DIALECT swine Tab ü The-son the-younger thee thou tohar TRANSLITERATION TRANSLITERATION AND TRANSLATION U-man Un-kar verb vowel Western Bhojpuri word Your-Honour’s
She was curious to our venture with the Kahunanui. We told her what the excursion was about, who the Kahunanui is (which by the way, she guessed who it was from the beginning). She then started to share some of her stories with us- all very informative
I call and get Aunty Paulette. I explained how/who gave me her name and what I was in the market for. Over the phone, she was very reserved and said very little other than to give me directions to her shop. So, my friend and I get there
Sevon W. said “We have used Tacos y Gorditas twice now, including over Labor Day weekend this year. I will use their services again, the food is excellent, and there is never a shortage! Unless you have a ridiculously…” read more
Several students, over the past four years, have gone beyond the classroom when it comes to perpetuating the language of our kūpuna. These individuals have not let their native language hamper them, but rather have used it as a stepping-stone in learning other languages. These classmates have simultaneously taken two language classes, Hawaiian and either Japanese, Spanish, or French. In the same sense, there are many students who have excelled academically through the years while continuing to study the Hawaiian Language. One-third of the students in my Hawaiian 5 class will be graduating tonight with Honors diplomas. Our culture does not have to be a roadblock to accomplishing great things, as some people may think. Kamehameha is headed in a positive direction. The “best” of both worlds — excellent scholarship and understanding of nā mea Hawai‘i — can be achieved, but only if we dedicate the time, effort, and belief in making it happen.
The abaya is most common in countries with large Muslim populations. Some denominations of Islam consider the entire female body, except for the face and hands, awrah – that which should be concealed in public from males unrelated by blood or marriage.
In his criticism of Richard Price’s work among the Saramaka of Suriname, Said suggests that this failure of Anthropology to transcend cultural relativism is more than a methodological one, but is also ethically and morally vacuous.  To illustrate the point, Said describes Price’s decision to reveal the secret information entrusted to him by the tribe in his scholarly writing.  Said’s contention is that such disclosure violates the Saramaka’s ability to manage their own cultural self-determination in precisely the same way that colonial overlords historically interfered with their political and social institutions.  Said goes on to emphasize that there is value in Price’s work, but in so doing highlights a perceived naiveté among some Anthropologists for the marginalizing effects their work may have.
“Nānā I Ke Kumu (Look to the Source), a two-volume work first published in 1979, describes Hawaiian beliefs and customs compiled by the Queen Lili‘uokalani Children’s Center to better understand and meet the needs of the Hawaiian families they served. Much of the books’ material was distilled from the Center’s Hawaiian Culture Study Committee’s weekly meetings. The authors strove to capture the freshness, the intimacy, and the “aliveness” of Hawaiian ideas put into action. Mary Kawena Pukui (1895–1986) is the primary source of information on Hawaiian culture not otherwise documented.
The rationale for the abaya is often attributed to the Quranic quote, “O Prophet, tell your wives and daughters, and the believing women, to cover themselves with a loose garment. They will thus be recognised and no harm will come to them” Qur’an 33:59[2] (Translated by Ahmed Ali) This quote is often given as the argument for wearing the abaya.
Me ke kāhāhā nui, ‘ike akula ‘o ia i ka mo’opuna āna, e waiho mai ana ke kula o Kaiolohia i ka La’i-luahine, a ‘ike akula ‘o ia i kēia keiki hapa Kaleponi e moe ana ma ka ‘ao’ao o kāna mo’opuna, e huli ana ke alo i luna, ‘a’ohe wahi koupu o lāua a ‘elua, a ‘ike pū akula nō ho’i ‘o ia i ke kumu ma’oma’o e kū ana i ke kula o Nininiwai, ua pehia iho e ka makani lawelawe mālie o ‘Īloli a waiho wale ka i’a ho’omalu a ke Konohiki, i ho’ohiki au i ku’u mea nani a ‘ike ‘oe.
We were coming back from South Point and found this on Google maps. It was a treasure. Good ole comfort food (grilled cheese sandwiches and burgers) but that was overtaken by their pies and cakes made… daily. The staff was outstanding. Will definitely come back. See More
I obviously began my speech tonight in Hawaiian. I then asked that the students and audience members who understood what I was saying stand to indicate their understanding. I realize that in no way does every individual sitting in the NBC tonight speak the Hawaiian Language; however, I wanted to prove a point. From the two dozen or so people who understood the speech of Noe Goodyear-Kaopua, look at how far we have come.
Ka Hana Keaka – Nā Wai Ola’s play inspiration is the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage of Hōkūle‘a.  ‘Ōlelo a Mo‘omeheu Hawai‘i support will be provided to haumāna as needed, depending on the focus of the various play scenes.
In the replica watches uk formal social occasions, rolex replica watches are often treated as jewelry, usually only for a ring jewelry to wear men, is very popular. In general, are round, oval, square, rectangular and diamond replica rolex watches, because of its solemn shape, conservative, wide range of applications, especially suitable for replica watches formal occasions to wear.
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Lashio has a humid subtropical climate (Cwa) according to the Köppen climate classification system, marked by heavy rains from May to October. The annual rainfall averages 54 inches (1,400 mm). The average maximum temperature is 27 °C (81 °F) and the average minimum 13 °C (55 °F) .[1][5] Temperatures are generally warm throughout the year, though nights are cool from December to March.
ʻO kekahi mea hou aku i hoihoi ai nā haumāna ka ʻike i ka ʻae ʻole ʻia o ka uku lawelawe ma nā haleʻaina a hōkele paha, eia naʻe, hāpai aʻela ʻo Mika Taniguchi i ka manaʻo kōkua e lawe aku i nā manaka liʻiliʻi mai Hawaiʻi mai ma kahi o ka uku lawelawe no ka mahalo ʻana i kā lākou hana nui.  Pīhoihoi nō hoʻi ka hui e hoʻohana i ka lumi hoʻopau pilikia!  Hai maila ʻo Ayaka no ka nui o nā pihi ma ka ʻaoʻao o ka lua i mea e mehana ai ka noho a i mea e kī ʻia kou hope a maʻemaʻe!  Hōʻike pū maila ʻo ia me ka hilahila, loaʻa kekahi ʻano mīkini leo ma loko o nā lumi hoʻopau pilikia o nā wāhine i mea e lohe ʻole ʻia nā kani like ʻole o ka hele ʻana i ia lumi.  I mea i hiki ai iā makou ke naʻana, a no ke kaʻana ʻana me nā hoa, eia ko lāua hōʻikeʻike.