“he aha ka hana a stylist e hana ai”

This smooth soft jacket features attached, lined hood, 7-snap placket with full hidden zipper, oversized flap pockets at front with snap closure, and adjustable bungee cord around hood and bottom hem.
PS Ke ala hoʻokahi e hiki ai iāʻoe keʻike i ka nui o kēia mea a pau e hoʻomaka i kēia lā. Kūleʻa mākou iāʻoe he 100%’Ake Paʻi kālā ma loko o nā lā he 60! ʻO kā mākou hopohopo no kēia polokalamu AMAZING . Hiki iāʻoe ke kau inoa no kāu hana mua loa i loko o nā minuke,ʻoiai ināʻoe i ke ala a pau ma India,ʻAtalia, aiʻoleʻo Singapore! ʻO ia ka nani e pili ana i ka Pūnaewele, he 24hr, World-Wide GOLDMINE! Hiki iāʻoe ke hana i kou makemake a me kou makemake
#sonnyching #sonnychingcollection #sccollection #sonnychingstyle #sonnychingcollectionbyparadisus #sonnychingbling #paradisusjewelry #theoriginal #sterlingsilver #silver #hawaiianjewelry #hawaiian #ohekapala #kakau #fromaculture #culturallyinspired #style #jewelry #aotd #iwa #leleiwa #mm2017 #merriemonarch2017
Although this story is not as satisfying in content or resolution as is Kīlau Pali’s previously published “Ke Mele a me ke Kaona o ia Mele i Haku ‘Ia” (Kuokoa, October 9, 1922; Kaleinaman: E Kū i ka Hoe Uli, v.3, Summer 2004), it is still of considerable interest to students of “‘ōlelo ‘ano lua” and the hoʻāeae: the story frequently employs language of the highest and most poetic sort; it gives the ho’āeae chant-form a specific social and historical context; it offers a glimpse into the manner in which the skills of a 19th century master chanter were engaged; and it encourages a redefinition of the ho’āeae as a distinct genre of poetry – and not simply as a set of vocal qualities with which an oli is delivered.
“I’m here because I believe in women’s rights, reproductive rights,” said protestor Dayna Puckett, “I believe in a woman’s right to choose and I believe that nobody can tell us what to do with our own bodies.”
Great food and a good value for Hawaii. We normally stop at the bakery in Naalehu, which though good is a bit of a tourist trap. However, across the street is a hidden Gem. It is not much to look at inside and out, however the food is very good and they have home baked desserts which are amazing. I had some of the best Teriyaki Beef I have ever had and my wife had a great pulled pork sandwich. Next time we are traveling through Naalehu, Hana Hou is our new “must stop” place to eat. The locals eat there and now we know why.
The service was excellent the food was delicious and plentiful the price was amazing. (my wife left her purse and the staff was patient and helpful when we called a week later to see if it was there)… everyone was very friendly. make this a MUST STOP between Hilo and Volcano. See More
The Hilo Field Study option will provide visits to these sites and present a symposium focusing on the transfer of the Hawaiian language in the classroom by “looking to the source” as foundational to Hawaiian language revitalization.
Update to the previous postings by miriam and ceren – sadly Aunty Mary Lou has had to retire…  I’m glad and fortunate to have been able to meet her and spend those precious few hours that I did with her.  The last I heard the shop is no longer open until 9:00 pm, but closes closer to 5 as Aunty Paulette is taking care of the shop by herself now.  Call ahead for hours.  
A ‘o nā lālani hope, e hō’ike ana ia i kahi makuahine, i ka ‘ike ‘ana ma ka puka makani i ka waiho mai a ke one pua rose o Mahamoku, a me ke kū mai a ka ‘āhui pola hīnano o Po’okū, a ua lilo i mea lili nui nāna ke ‘ike aku i kēia keiki.
Gil C. said “I found this place on yelp and decided to give it a try because of the reviews and I’m glad I did. After doing some price comparisons with other shops I found that I could get the most for my money here. Not…” read more
As you know, I love reading!  I am NOT the only one…Like the ʻŌlelo Noeʻau: “Nānā i ke kumu” says…look to the source.  This means to learn from various sources…in this case, letʻs learn about reading from our kumu . Scan the QR codes below to see the V.I.P (Very Important People) on our Keaʻau campus who  love reading!  You may find some great books to help you with genre selection, read some profound thoughts on the book, learn a little more about these V.I.P, AND find that they VALUE reading too!  Being a LIFE-LONG reader is so important!
The definition he shared for ‘āina as place has always struck me as being concisely intuitive and easy to remember. He said that ‘sense of place’ involves both the feel of a place, and the feel for a place. He taught us that place is personally defined for people by their own “locational experiences,” bridging of and for. He urged our business team to open our company with a spirit of hospitality creating fertile ground for stakeholders to gain place-connected experiences while they were involved with us. They could then feel for themselves what the Aloha spirit was all about, of and for. He explained this as key to being “culturally correct” in the way we shared Hawai‘i with visitors as well: A guest experience could be a experience too.
Aunty Paulette & Aunty Mary Lou have a huge place in Hawaiian history, because they have contributed so much to the preservation of the talent for feather lei making.  The talent and aloha of these two icon oozes out when you go and visit their shop on Kapahulu Avenue.
Premium-quality performance outerwear/activewear 3-piece set; NWT OLD NAVY Go-Warm genuine down insulation, full-zip, fitted hood, zipper pockets, stretch fleece underarm/side panels for improved fit/function. Retails for $80 Shortsleeve sport tee, raglan sleeve/performance design, breathable/quick dry polyester fabric, new without tags. Sleeveless sport tee, performance design, breathable/quick-dry polyester fabric, new without tags (small blem on rear hem seam, heat exposure/no holes) All items are sized mens Large.
For one of the best dining experiences on the Big Island, you can’t pass up an opportunity to grab a bite at Hana Hou Restaurant! Whether you’re in the mood for one of our grab-and-go sandwiches or you’re ready to sit down and feast on some good old-fashioned comfort food, we’ve got just the menu for you. Try one of our signature entrées like the Loco Moco or Hogzilla Burrito, or opt for one of our mouth watering gluten free or vegetarian dishes, like our amazing vegetarian stir fry. We guarantee that no matter what you choose to dine on, your taste buds will be delighted!
nā kūkā o ka rosepua puanā mane limaHoʻoponopono naʻauke poʻo o ke kīkekenā lima limamahina kuʻika peʻa makamakai moenā hōʻailona zodiac hōʻailonaka lākaikuahineka papakūka lei kalaunuka pehu wainā kui kuika pumehanaka puake kuʻike kāʻei kapuka heleuma kahikonā peʻumeʻa maikaʻiAnkle Tattooske poʻonā pāʻani maʻamaunā lima limaka leo kinihoa maikaʻi loanā’ōpuni no nā kaikamāhineka wāwae wāwaeka peʻa a peʻemehndi manaʻonā kuʻikuʻi no nā kāneKa Peʻa Paʻanā kākoʻo hopeka hemokukupa kukupaʻo ka momonaʻeleʻeleʻeleʻelenā’ānela angelnā manaʻo lepeka diamond tattoopāʻani kāpunika pua leʻaleʻanā koʻi āpaunāʻae eaglenā kūlana iwika pelekikenanā manu manuka peʻa
I panina, he mau hoʻolaha hoʻomaopopo kā mākou i lohe ai a ua loaʻa kekahi mau makana mai ka ʻAha ʻAmelika-Iāpana i mākaukau aʻe mākou.  Pīhoihoi maoli!  ʻO ka hui hou ʻana o mākou, ʻo ia hoʻi ka hui ʻana i ke kakahiaka [kohu kakahiaka nui no mākou, nā haumāna kulanui] o ka Poʻaono e eʻe ai ma luna o ka mokulele.
We have a new kitchen all new equipment and a really cool bakers oven. Now as the holidays approach we will need to add to our Hana Hou family. We will be hiring all positions so if you are interested or know someone who might like to apply please come on down and grab an application.
Wahi a Kaʻilihou, “Mākaukau lākou. I ka hoʻomaka ʻana, ua haʻalulu i ka paio me nā kumu. A laila, ua haʻalulu i ka paʻa kūpono i ka ʻikepili no nā nīnūnē ʻelua. A laila, ua haʻalulu nui i ka hoʻohana ʻana i ka ʻike ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. Akā naʻe, i kēia manawa, ua haʻalele iki lākou i kēlā haʻaluu, a laila ua hoʻohana maoli lākou i ko lākou ʻike ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi. ʻO ia ka puka lanakila maoli.”
In historic fashion the Hana Hou 18’s for the second consecutive year has earned the prestigious ” American Bid” for the USAV Junior National Championships. The 18’s JO’s will be from April 27-29, 2018 at the Anaheim Convention Center.
Eha mau malama i pule ole ai, no ka oihana o ka makahiki, he mau pule no nae e pili ana i ka oihana o ka makahiki, ma ka malama o Mahoehope e pau ai ka haipule ana, a na mea a pau, a koe o ka kahu akua wale no ke haipule mau.
(The Taco Tita person was very friendly though. She apologized for the inconvenience and explained why there was this no-taking-your-food-next-door policy, even though the restaurants are owned by the same owner.)
Pili ka ʻāina mai uka a i kai a pili nō hoʻi ka ʻāina a me ke kai ma muli o ke kahe ʻana mai o ka wai, no laila, pili ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike ʻo Mānoa Heritage me Ka Papa Loʻi ʻo Kānewai a me ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī.
Some of the Bru Na Boinne selected garments have features you wouldn’t see in your everyday clothing store. Their clothes have a modern, laid-back aesthetic that evokes a sense of the modern countryside, giving them an urbanite-in-the-rough feel. They use standard and durable fabric for all their items such as denim for jeans, heavy cotton for chinos and soft cotton for their t-shirts.
Bio: Moses Goods is one of Hawaiʻi’s most prominent theatre artists. Originally from the island of Maui and now based in Honolulu he has traveled nationally and internationally performing his original work to a wide range of audiences. His body of work ranges from full length plays to theatrical storytelling pieces most of which are strongly rooted in Native Hawaiian culture.
Ka Wai—Ua piha ‘o Mānoa i nā lo‘i kalo ma nā ‘ao‘ao ‘elua mai uka a hiki i kahi o ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī i kēia lā (e nānā hou i nā kiʻi kahiko). He aha ka mea koʻikoʻi loa e pono ai nā loʻi kalo? KA WAI. Nui nā kumu wai o Mānoa a he awāwa ākea nō ho‘i ia (ʻo ia kekahi manaʻo o mānoa). E ʻikemaka ʻoukou i kona ākea i kēia lā a e lohe ana i nā moʻolelo no kekahi o nā kumu wai.
The Women’s March On Washington- Maui Style attracted an estimated crowd of 5,000 people. The sea of people marched up and down Kaahumanu Avenue holding their signs high and chanting. Protesters participated to not only stand up for women’s rights but also to advocate for equal rights for immigrants, all ethnicities and disabilities as well as to show opposition to President Trump.
Out for my weekly pilgrimage to the Wednesday Downtown Curbside bites lunch,  I perused that weeks trucks and spotted one that I had never seen before.  What was this light blue truck?…… Hawaiian. Ooooh, I love Hawaiian.  Give me a big mound of Kalua Pork and rice and I am one happy camper.  I was totally excited to try it, and led my lunch buddies over to the truck.  2 of us tried the Kalua Pork plates and another tried the lumpia.  The lumpia was really, really oily.  The rice that came with the pork was the sticky gelatinous kind which my friend really liked.  The pork was ok.  It lacked a little saltiness and that smoked flavor that usually comes with being smoked in an imu all day, but it was moist.  The sandwich version comes with BBQ sauce so that one probably had more flavor.  The employees were super nice and my food was ready really quickly, so two pluses for them.  
Ch.17 p.87 para.6 sent.2 I nānā aku ka hana o ke aliʻi i kāna ʻīlio, ua pau nā pepeiao a me ka huelo i ka moʻo, a no kēia mea, manaʻo aʻela ʻo ʻAiwohikupua e hoʻi, no ka mea, ua pio lākou. when the chief looked him over, gone were the ears and tail inside the lizard. So Aiwohikupua resolved to depart, since they were vanquished.
Ch.11 p.58 para.7 sent.3 A no ka uluhua o Lāʻieikawai, kēnā aʻela ʻo ia i kona wahi kahu e hele e nānā i kahi i kani mai ai kēia mea kani. And, her interest aroused, she sent her attendant to see where the musical instrument was which was played so near her.

“aia i ka hana a nā mea hoʻolālā kiʻi”

The pū ‘ohe is a Hawaiian bamboo trumpet. It has a deep sound somewhat like a conch shell and like other native instruments, takes the special spirit breath to produce the proper sound. Join rangers and Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association staff as they share their knowledge and help you make your own pū ‘ohe.
Loaʻa iāʻoe he pēpē a me ka hoʻounaʻana! No laila,ʻo ia keʻano kūʻai nui e koho ana i ka manawa kūpono e hahai ai i ka noho maikaʻi loa no ke kaikamahine aiʻole he mea nui ke keiki. I kēlā me kēia manawaʻaʻoleʻoe i makemake i kahi 14 kākiki kākiō, i hoʻomaka wau me eBay. ʻO wau ke’ōlelo,ʻaʻole ia he launa, akāʻo kēia ka mea e hanaʻia. “Makemake wau e lohe i nā mea e pono aiʻoe e haʻi. “ʻAʻole maopopo iaʻu ka mea i waiho i ke aloha o nā kānaka e loaʻa i ka pals. ʻAʻoleʻo ia i kāna hoa pono’ī.
Prof o Orena kūkā me nā hoapili a puni ka honua. He manao i hana ai i loko o kona ‘oihana a pau o ka oi ma mua o 30 makahiki oia i ike i ka hoomanawanui me ka loa hookolokolo aku la ia hihia o ka hepatitis C ka poe ola me keia hoʻomanawanui.
Old navy pullover jacket is in great condition. Has hideaway hood for easy access and vented holes on sleeves. 100% Nylon Shell. Measures: Length 30 1/2″, Underarm to underarm 24″, Shoulder Seam to Cuff 24” (H-8)
Iā Kauhi e iho ana i kai, lohe ʻia aʻela ʻo ia i ke oli ʻana mai o Kahalaopuna ma hope ona. Pēlā ʻo ia i ʻike ai, ua ola hou ʻo Kahalaopuna. No laila, piʻi hou aʻela ʻo ia i uka no ka pepehi hou ʻana i kāna wahine uʻi. Ua hili hou akula ʻo ia i ke poʻo o Kahalaopuna i ka ʻāhui hala a make. Kanu hou ihola ʻia kona kino i ka lepo a haʻalele akula iā Mānoa. Hoʻōla hou ihola ke akua pueo iā Kahalaopuna i ka hoʻi ʻana o Kauhi i kai. A oli hou akula ʻo Kahalaopuna i ke mele no Kauhi.
No nā hana mālama pono ʻana i ko ka honua – no ke kākoʻo ʻana mai i nā hana pono e pili ana i ka mālama ʻana i nā mea ulu, ame ka hoʻokahua ʻana i nā hana pono i waena o kekahi i kekahi, ame nā mea maoli ko ke ao nei.
Ch.26 p.138 para.6 sent.1 A pau kēia mau mea i ka hōʻike ʻia, i nānā aku ka hana o ʻAiwohikupua a me nā mea ʻē aʻe, e kū mai ana ʻo Lāʻieikawai ma loko o ka pūloʻuloʻu aliʻi kapu i luna o nā waʻa. After all these signs had been displayed, Aiwohikupua and the others saw Laieikawai standing above the canoes under the symbol of a taboo chief.
Ināʻoe e noʻonoʻo i ka kākauʻana i ke kālā ma ka pūnaewele, e nānā hou akuʻoe! ʻO ka kākau’ana-jobs.net kahiʻoihana kūikawāʻoihana pilikino maikaʻi loa ma ka pūnaewele. Ma waho o nā tausani kākau kākau hana, hōʻole lākou i ka hōʻailona, ​​nā hōʻoia o kēlā me kēia papa kuhikuhi e pono e kōkua iāʻoe e loaʻa ka loaʻa kālā mai ke kākauʻana! ʻO nā meaʻoi loa i hoʻohālikelikeʻia me nā palapala pūnaewele freelance, writing-jobs.netʻaʻole e lawe i nā komisina mai kāu loaʻa. No laila e loaʻa iāʻoe 100% o kāu kālā paʻakikī i kēlā me kēia manawa!
Ua heleʻo 988 makahiki he mau makahiki,ʻoiai e ulu ana nā mea. Ua hana maʻalahi ia i ka hana. “Wiwoʻole, ināʻo kēia ka mea āu e makemake aiʻAʻoleʻole, hoʻomaka lākou e’ōlelo. Eʻike i kahi e hele aiʻoe. Ma waena o nā mea i kaulana a me ka hakakā e pili ana i ka moemoeke nui,ʻo ia kaʻoiaʻiʻo e hiki ai iāʻoe ke loaʻa i ka wahine hoʻokamakama. ʻAe,ʻo ia kahi manaʻo hoʻopuka maikaʻi!
We love this restaurant, we went to eat there two years ago when we were on vacation and just had to go again on this vacation. The food is yummy and the service is friendly. If you like good desserts… you have to try some from Hana Hou because they are so tasty. See More
#sonnyching #sonnychingstyle #sonnychingcollection #sonnychingjewelry #SCcollectionbyparadisus #sonnychingbling #aotd #māui #jewelry #jewelrydesigner #style #stylehawaii #kakau #ohekapala #fromaculture #culturallyinspired #hawaiian #hawaiianstyle #hawaiianjewelry
Nana I Ke Kumu is the definitive book on Hawaiian culture. Mary Pukui still lived within and was connected to the old Hawaiian culture when she wrote this and other books such as the Hawaiian Dictionary.
The store is a nice and cozy little store. The store offers very reasonable and very unique feathers to make leis. Feathers from the goose, to the rooster, to the peacock, to peasant, etc are all in the store ready for your selection. Prices are very reasonable, and Mele is always willing to give you a quick tip or hint if you ask. There are several ready-made lei hulu for sale in a display case – made by the aunties and their haumana (students). My favorite thing in the store is the royalty cape made purely of yellow and red feathers. It’s one of Aunty Mary Lou’s most famous masterpieces!

“no ke aha i loea ai kaʻoihana iāʻoe”

For Said, Orientalism represents a dynamic relationship with the “Other” that has implications as a cultural lens.  First, it is a discursive lens.  That is to say, Orientalism is a reflexive and self-sustaining set of particular narratives which frame notions of the Orient and its people.  Second, it is an expression of imperial power.  According to this view, being defined by its European colonizers, Orientalism cannot be disassociated from the wider sociopolitical complex to which Western scholars belong, and from the hegemonic agendas implicit to their work.  Finally, it is perhaps more representative of the West than it claims to be of the East.
We booked Hana Hou for an event and they were so accommodating! I highly recommend them for events. Nyla was very quick to answer emails and answered all of my questions. I truly appreciated their willingness to help us out.
On our way back from South Point we stopped at the HANA HOU Restaurant. There were three of us in our group. I ordered the big burger my son order the gravy burger and my wife ordered the tuna melt…. All three were very good. The service was exceptional and the waitress was friendly and efficient. We got there just before lunch and the crowd that came in. If you like good desserts, try any of the homemade pies they offer. I had the banana cream and it was fabulous. I give Hana Hou 5 Stars. See More
Ch.3 p.13 para.1 sent.2 Nānā akula ʻo ia, e piʻo ana ke ānuenue i kahi a ua wahi kanaka nei i ʻōlelo ai iā ia, a laila, hoʻomaopopo leʻa ihola ka makāula, ʻo kāna mea nō e ukali nei. there he saw the rainbow arching over the place which the man had described to him; so he was sure that this was the person he was following.
Ma hope o E hookupaa ana i ka hoʻomanawanui i ka mana kupaianaha ke ola, i ka Aha Kiekie ke kauoha i GcMAF a me’okikene kolu Inc lapaʻau e hoomau a piha ke ola a me ka kālā kākoʻo mai o kaʻIseraʻela Kuhina o Pale Kaua.
“I’m here for a better world for my kids,” said protestor Gwen Rivera holding her twin children, a boy and girl, close. “I want them to have the same opportunities growing up,” Rivera said, “I want them to do all the same things they want to do with their lives.”
2012 Neurologist: ka hoomanawanui i manawa ulu kiʻekiʻe e holumua ai MS. Aia mea i ike pono ka iapaau ana no keia kulana, i ka hoʻomanawanui ua hoʻopaʻaʻia i ka noho huila, aʻaʻole e e hiki ke hele hou.
Kawahinela‘iokekapu, is a sacred woman, a mo‘owahine (lizard woman), or a caretaker of a pond upon Hualālai, she seeks a companion of the lower lands. Upon the tears, a stream, she sends a garland (lei) of mountain snail(s) seaward.
This ōlelo no’eau is a saying that tells how you should look to the source. The source can be many things such as teachers, parents, grand parents or siblings. The source is the the person who sets an example for you. It’s something that you can learn and receive knowledge from. To me my scourge is my school members and teachers and relatives.
I have been fond follower of Kumu Noeau since my kamalii were all attending Kula Kaiapunu Hawaii o Kapaa. His Name has always been on my heart because he is true to his inca in every sense of its manao. I only wish I had the opportunity to have met him face to face. How waiwai his naauao is and always will be. Ke Aloha mau no…Iesū pū.
My Opinion May Differ From Yours. A Difference Of Opinion Doesn’t Mean That The Item Has Been Misrepresented. This Is Exactly What You Will Be Receiving. It Is Impossible To Describe Every Little Detail.
Repost @nowthisnews The amount of trash in the ocean off Honduras is gut-wrenching. Have you guys seen this? I was competing in the 2017 World Freediving Champi…onships in Roatan two months ago!!! @take3forthesea @paulnicklen @justinhofman @greenpeaceap @danmacpherson @endextinctionintl @tpw_foundation @ocean @flightcentreau @seanscottphotography @forrestinwonderland @underwater_explorer #plastic #ocean #breakfast #today #nature #underwater #picoftheday #ocean #bluewater #inspire #inspiration #motivation #wow #water #reality #matrix #dive #diver #paradise #exotic #dreamholiday #perfectworld #video #slowmotion #legs #fitspo #yoga #zen #roatan #honduras
Mai mākilo wale! Ma mua o ka lā 4 o ‘Okakopa, e kū’ē like nā Haku ‘Ōhi’a i ka ho’ouna hou ‘ia ‘ana o nā ki’i o Kū i kahi a lāua i waiho ‘ia ai no nā makahiki he nui i hala a’ela, ‘o ia ho’i, i nā hale hō’ike’ike o nā ‘āina ‘ē. Mai ha’alele i ko lāua one hānau. E kū mau i Hawai’i a mau!
Huhū nō ‘o Leialoha. Ua ‘imi aku ka wahine moloā iā Kalei. Aia ‘o Kalei i loko o kona hale. Ua ‘uā ‘o Leialoha iā ia, “E aha ana ‘oe? He aha kou pilikia?” Ua ‘aka‘aka wale ‘o Kalei a ‘ōlelo mai ‘o ia, “He u‘i lolena kū i ki‘ona!”
Ch.6 p.36 para.5 sent.1 Iā ʻAiwohikupua e nānā ana i ka hale o ke aliʻi wahine o Paliuli, he mea ʻē ke kāhāhā a me ka hilahila. When Aiwohikupua saw the house of the princess of Paliuli, he felt strangely perplexed and abashed,
Ch.17 p.87 para.5 sent.2 A lohe akula lākou iā ʻUlili mā i kēia kaua a ka moʻo me ka ʻīlio, a he mea mau naʻe iā ʻAiwohikupua ma ka nānā iā uka. When they heard from Snipe and his companion of this battle between the lizard and the dog, Aiwohikupua looked toward the mountain.
My own scholarship belongs to the discipline of Cultural Anthropology, with a specific interest in the peoples of the island Pacific. I am biologically male with a masculine gender identity. I am not myself an indigenous person, nor a native speaker of any language other than American English. As such, my experiential and epistemological biases may be different from any indigenous people, individuals with other gender identities or sexual orientations, biological females, Sociologists, Psychologists, or Linguists among you. I invite your thoughtful and authentic participation in any of the conversations you find here, and I encourage you to add your wisdom to the discourse.
Nā Keiki A Ka ʻOhana – Haumāna will expand their ʻohana vocabulary by learning Hawaiian sibling terms which incorporate aspects of age and gender more specifically.  Haumāna will learn to ask and answer the questions ʻehia (how many) and pehea (how) with sibling terms and other terms such as hoa hānau (cousins) and hoa aloha (friends).
Today I went to Hana Hou for the first time and had the Stuffed Papaya, filled with mac nut chicken salad and it came with a bed of greens and a yummy unique dressing. It was absolutely delicious! Foo…d is excellent and the waitresses were amazing too, very friendly and outstanding service. Can’t wait to try more of their dishes! See More
It’s so hard to come across a legit food truck where the price can match the quality of what you’re eating, and I can’t wait for this one to come back, and taste another piece of the menu.   They were very friendly (not very many food truck occupants are) and the food was delicious.   Bonus… They told me how long the food would take, so I wouldn’t be sitting there angrily.   I chose to devour (because thats what I did) the kalua pork burger, and returned to work with a mini food coma.  Good!
2506 ʻO Mahoehope ke kāne, ʻo Lanihua ka wahine, hānau ke keiki he kōkua nui a waiū nunui. Mahoehope is the husband, Lanihua (Productive-heavenly-one) is the wife; a child born to them is either thick-shouldered or large-busted.
“There are support services out there. There are people who will help you. You do not need to stay in an abusive situation,” said Hawaii State Sen. Roz Baker, who spoke about domestic violence shelters and support programs. Sen. Baker is a member of the Women’s Legislative Caucus of the State of Hawaii, a coalition of women from the State Senate and House of Representatives that has championed a number of bills for victims of domestic violence.
A kokoke ‘o ia i ka puka pā o ka u’i āna e li’a nei, ‘ike akula ‘o ia iā Helena e noho ana ma waho o ka lānai, i ka ‘ike ‘ana mai nō ho’i ‘o Helena iā ia, ani maila ‘o ia i kona lima me ka mūkī ‘ana a’e i ka waha, a pe’ape’ahi maila me ke kuhikuhi ‘ana mai e iho i ke kaona a ho’i aku ma laila, i ke ano o ke ahiahi.
Upon the most sacred night, Pō Kāne, Kawahinela‘iokekapu leaves her pond in search of Kaupo‘ohiwi on the shores of Honokōhau. As she reaches his dwelling, she sings a familiar song to Kaupo‘ohiwi. He turns and both Kawahinela‘iokekapu and Kaupo‘ohiwi are face-to-face with similar lei hīhīwai of Hualālai.
ʻO ka haʻi ʻana i nā moʻolelo a me nā moʻokūʻauhau kekahi loina Hawaiʻi a ke kupuna a na kākou e hoʻomau i kēia mau loina i kēia wā me ka maiau a me ka maʻemaʻe, no ka mea, he kuleana koʻikoʻi kēia no kākou.
Great food and a good value for Hawaii. We normally stop at the bakery in Naalehu, which though good is a bit of a tourist trap. However, across the street is a hidden Gem. It is not much to look at inside and out, however the food is very good and they have home baked desserts which are amazing. I had some of the best Teriyaki Beef I have ever had and my wife had a great pulled pork sandwich. Next time we are traveling through Naalehu, Hana Hou is our new “must stop” place to eat. The locals eat there and now we know why.
Some ten years later, in an article entitled Representing the Colonized: Anthropology’s Interlocutors, Said elaborates on these concepts and takes a much harder line.  Here, the author emphasizes a crisis of representation in Anthropology and argues that the discipline has largely failed to effectively confront its own history as a cog in the colonial machine.  From my perspective, his critique is a fair one where he describes the Anthropological tendency to seek out “un-developed” non-Western societies for research characterized by classification and observation of the powerless by the powerful.  The resulting representations of the people observed is necessarily a translation of “Otherness” into the discursive language of the Anthropologist and their particular culture.
#sccollectionbyparadisus #sonnychingcollection #sonnyching #paradisusjewelry #theoriginal #silverjewelry #silver #jewelry #moolelo #hawaiianjewelry #hawaii #womensfashion #style #hina #hoaka #fromaculture #hoololi #culturallyinspired #elegance #hinaschair #timeless #art
Makaʻāinana were the equivalent of today’s citizens of Hawaiʻi. They made up the largest class of people in traditional society. Makaʻāinana lived in an ahupuaʻa (traditional land division) system. The ahupuaʻa were governed by managers or konohiki. The kuleana of the konohiki was to oversee the land, collect the taxes, and distribute community resources. The konohiki reported to the aliʻi. The konohiki and makaʻāinana were both governed by the aliʻi.
One aspect highlighted the use of song to make a statement, specifically the mele “Ka Wai a Kāne”. According to ʻIkaʻaka Pang, a Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani student, “Reggae has universal popularity nowadays. Kaʻikena used this popular genre that is often a platform for addressing social issues to give this mele renewed meaning for us today!” Kailihou says that, “We know that understanding and using our Hawaiian language gives us a unique perspective. Using our language to continually recontextualize traditional knowledge for new generations is critical.”
Ke hoomanawanui Lawe ae la lakouʻike mau Inc me nā mea a pau i loaʻa antibiotics no ka makahiki tuberculosis 10 me ka maikai kanawai, INITIALLY. Ma hope o 10 makahiki o ka lapaʻau, ke ahonui, i ka ai ‘, a me ka Inc māhuahua lilo kona laulā. Ua ma luna iho hoʻoholo e hoʻomaka kiʻekiʻe-mahele lāʻau intravenous wikamina C (25 g) hookahi manawa i ka pule (he huina o 239 manawa) ma luna o ka 4-makahiki ‘alemanaka, a Lawe ae la lakou High-mahele lāʻau GcMAF (1500 ng, 0.5 ml) hookahi manawa i ka pule (ka huina 41 o ka manawa) no ma kahi o hoʻokahi makahiki kokoke i ka hopena o ka 4-makahiki au. Ma hope o 4 makahiki o ka lapaʻau, he pahu HI scan NineManga.com hōʻike wale nō me ka makaʻu no’aʻaʻa me kaʻeleu pulmonary infiltrations.
Although this story is not as satisfying in content or resolution as is Kīlau Pali’s previously published “Ke Mele a me ke Kaona o ia Mele i Haku ‘Ia” (Kuokoa, October 9, 1922; Kaleinaman: E Kū i ka Hoe Uli, v.3, Summer 2004), it is still of considerable interest to students of “‘ōlelo ‘ano lua” and the hoʻāeae: the story frequently employs language of the highest and most poetic sort; it gives the ho’āeae chant-form a specific social and historical context; it offers a glimpse into the manner in which the skills of a 19th century master chanter were engaged; and it encourages a redefinition of the ho’āeae as a distinct genre of poetry – and not simply as a set of vocal qualities with which an oli is delivered.
Hō‘ea lākou i ke kahakai ‘o Waimea a lele nā keiki kāne i ke ka‘a. Holo nā keiki kāne i ka moana. Kāhea ‘o Pāpā, “E kali ‘oukou!” Huli hope nā keiki kāne. Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā lākou, “E kokua mai.” Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā Kawika, “E lawe ‘oe i ka ‘aina awakea.” Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā Micah, “E lawe ‘oe nā kāwele.” Ha‘i ‘o Pāpā iā Makana, “E lawe ‘oe i nā papa he‘e nalu.” ‘Ōlelo ‘o Pāpā, “E lawe au i nā mea inu.”
He has mentored students in oli and hei (string figures) as a master teacher under the State Foundation of Culture and Arts. His Ph.D dissertation in Curriculum Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi concentrated on revitalizing language and culture through performances such as hei.
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

“ka mea kūʻai aku i ka pepa kiʻi kiʻi kiʻi hollywood”

1  ¶  E mililani aku iā Iēhova, e kāhea aku hoʻi i kona inoa;     E hōʻike aku hoʻi i kāna mau hana i waena o nā kānaka. 2 E ʻoli aku iā ia, e hoʻoleʻa aku iā ia;     E hoʻokaulana aku i kāna mau hana a pau. 3 E ʻoukou ma kona inoa hoʻāno,     E leʻaleʻa hoʻi ka naʻau o ka poʻe ʻimi iā Iēhova. 4 E huli ʻoukou iā Iēhova, a me kona ikaika;     E ʻimi mau loa aku hoʻi i kona maka. 5 E hoʻomanaʻo i nā hana mana āna i hana ai,     A me kāna mau mea kupanaha,     A me ka hoʻoponopono ʻana o kona waha: 6 E nā pua a ʻAberahama, a kāna kauwā,     E nā mamo a Iakoba, kona mea i wae ai. 7 ʻO ia nō ʻo Iēhova, ko kākou Akua:     Aia ma ka honua a pau kāna hoʻoponopono ʻana. 8  ¶  Ua hoʻomanaʻo mau mai ʻo ia i kona berita,     I ka ʻōlelo hoʻi āna i kauoha mai ai i nā hanauna, he tausani;
Throughout the week that Hōkūleʻa was docked in Mānele Bay, community members of Lānaʻi and visitors alike were encouraged to visit the canoe, take tours, and learn about the vessel and its upcoming worldwide mission. One of the student groups that joined in were the haumāna of Nā Pua Noʻeau Lānaʻi.
Drydock is a essential part of the holistic nature of canoe culture. During drydock, learners are exposed to the importance of vessel maintenance. Through drydock programs NKW emphasizes the Hawaiian value of Mālama, to take care of. Most drydock programs center around the mālama (maintenance) of Makaliʻi, our main voyaging vessel. Participants have the opportunity to learn lashing, vessel engineering, and other tasks related to maintaining the sea-going integrity of Makaliʻi. Learners become very familiar with canoe parts and how each part is related to the other parts, a direct reflection of our own community’s make-up.
To all of you who love our Hawai’i, greetings of aloha. Here we are sailing on two esteemed double-hulled canoes from the island of Oʻahu (referred to as “Oʻahu child of Lua”) – Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia. We have left the Kanilehua rains of verdant Hawaiʻi island headed for Rangiroa in the Tuamotu islands, and from there we will forge ahead to Papeʻete in Tahiti, the same place where Hōkūleʻa first made landfall back in 1976.
Ch.11 p.58 para.3 sent.2 Malia paha o lilo ka ʻaʻā mau ʻana a ke ahi i nā pō a pau i mea no ke aliʻi e uluhua ai, a laila, hele mai e nānā iā kākou, a laila, pēlā paha e ʻike ai kākou iā Lāʻieikawai.” perhaps the fire burning every night will annoy the princess so she will come to find out about us, then perhaps we shall see Laieikawai.”
Welcome to nānā pono! This small corner of the virtual world is concerned primarily with the breathtaking diversity of cultural constructions and expressions of personhood around the globe. In particular, we will focus on sex roles, gender norms, emotional display rules, socialization rituals and the embodied experience of integrating all of these disparate threads into the complex tapestry of personhood.
The words “sense of place” echo much farther back within my consciousness; I cannot tell you when I first heard them, for it seems they’ve always been there. Beyond words, they’ve been more of an assumption for me, something I have—something I need—to help me grow in respect for Hawai‘i, land that gave me birth and nurtured me as I grew. And beyond paying respect, to Mālama her, honor and care for her whenever it is in my power to do so.
Workshop lengths vary from one hour to one weekend.  Most of these workshops are best suited for specific sites although they can be adapted to any site required. Please visit our SITES page for more information on those sites associated specifically with navigation.
Hawaii has no shortage of talented designers, and we love when they come to showcase their work at Honolulu Night Market. You’ll be able to see new collections, browse online shops (in person) all under one roof!
No nā hana mālama pono ʻana i ko ka honua – no ke kākoʻo ʻana mai i nā hana pono e pili ana i ka mālama ʻana i nā mea ulu, ame ka hoʻokahua ʻana i nā hana pono i waena o kekahi i kekahi, ame nā mea maoli ko ke ao nei.
The best and most likely the ONLY place to learn how to make feather leis. It is a little difficult to find, but track it down to make sure you can sign up for a feather lei making class!!!!! Aunty Mary Lou is really a Hawaiian treasure and her daughter are at the store from 9am to 9pm everyday to work on incredible pieces. This is a traditional Hawaiian art that could conceivably go into extinction if they did not keep this store open for us to learn this incredible art form. Not really for children to work on because it takes a great deal of patience, but you can even go here to buy feathers of any color of the rainbow for your own collection. You will have a hard time finding a place like this in the world,  it is tiny, but  GO THERE NOW!
Whether you’re looking for a specific item, or totally reinventing your wardrobe, you’ll find handsome and tasteful men’s clothing in this inspired collection from Banana Republic. Browse stylish options for a variety of occasions, from work in a fast paced office, to date night with that special someone, to enjoying a barbecue in the backyard with your family and friends. Versatile men’s fashion is easy to dress up and down. Look great from your morning commute to the late night after-party with these adaptable designs. Feel confident and look incredible. With the right clothes for men, the world is your oyster.
I kekahi lā, ua loa’a maila he leka mai Hawai’i mai na ke kaikua’ana o kēia kanaka, e kauoha mai ana iā ia a me ka māmā o lāua e holo aku, e ho’oponopono i ka waiwai, no ka mea he ma’i kona, ua ‘ōlelo ke kahuna ‘a’ole ‘o ia e ola.
Delicious food. The first time I came here I had a tuna melt with grilled potato wedges. The bread is house baked, lightly covered in butter and sooooo good. Generous portion. For dessert I had chocolate macadamia nut pie and my husband had Kau lime pie.
Ch.4 p.26 para.2 sent.1 I kekahi lā aʻe, haʻalele lākou iā Kapakai, holo akula lākou a ma waho pono o Kauhola, nānā akula ʻo ʻAiwohikupua i ka ʻākoakoa lehulehu ʻana o nā kānaka ma uka o Kapaʻau. The next day they left Kapakai and sailed along by Kauhola, and Aiwohikupua saw a crowd of men gathering mountainward of Kapaau.
People go to culinary school to become better chefs; they attend art school to become better artists; they enroll at law school to become better lawyers; we were students at a Hawaiian school to become better Hawaiians.
Ka Huaka‘i I Ka Hale Ali‘i ‘O ‘Iolani – Haumāna will learn “Ka Na‘i Aupuni” in honor of Ka Mō‘ī Kamehameha and “Makalapua” in honor of Ka Mō‘ī Wahine Lili‘uokalani.  This will help to enhance their understanding of the significance of their statues near ‘Iolani Palace.
ハワイアントリオ featuring Yuka Sanada (Vocal, Uke), Marina Iida (Vocal, Bass) & 吉田 丈二 (Joji Yoshida) (Guitar, Vocal) のライブを行います。生バンドの伴奏で踊る機会の少ない沖縄で、メレフラスタイルのフル2時間、ジュークボックス化したバンドをバックに遠慮ゼロで1曲目からラストまで踊りまくっていただきたい。両先生のソロフラも観れます。ミュージックチャージ1500円。お食事、ドリンクはお好みでご注文ください。…
Super cool, floral Hawaiian aloha party theme. 100% spun rayon is very soft and fine. Keep in mind that flash photo will ACCENTUATE things such as: specks of dirt, scratches, nicks, minor blemishes, etc.
#sonnyching #sonnychingcollection #SCCollectionByParadisus #sonnychingstyle #mystyle #paradisusjewelry #theoriginal #menswear #mens #womens #mensfashion #accessories #aotd #womensfashion #street #style #hawaii #hawaiian #ohekapala #kakau #silver #jewelry #culturallyinspired #hawaiianjewelry #neekau #kumuthefashionguru #menstyle
If we keep producing and consuming plastic at current rates, plastic will outweigh fish pound for pound by 2050. Reduce and eliminate plastic from your daily use, start right now. Art by John Holcroft.
afflicted animal ankh applied Arabic beat beautiful bhang bird body boil Brahman called caste cause cloth coin colour comp concealed dār deceit Deity denotes desire dignity dish distress dress earth elephant epithet fakir favour female fire flatulent flower fortune friendship fruit gold grain ground hair hand harām head Hindi Hindus honá honour horse hukka India interj intoxicated jānā jewels kāfir karna kind of sweetmeat king kur,án labour lagānā lāna land lená marriage means Mecca ment mode Musalmāns musical mode ness night one’s ornament pain parched grain Persian person plough possessed prince pron prosperity relating religious revenue rice royal ruined Sanskrit season servant snake sound species splendour string stupid sweetmeat tarika thing thread tion tree Vedas vessel village Vishnu vulg wicked wife woman word worn
For a business, this means they can significantly sort out, then solve any disconnection existing between how a company operates, and how all its stakeholders believe it should operate ethically, morally, and in human awareness of place-related contexts. Those stakeholders include staff, all partnerships, and those in a business’s surrounding community.
Representatives from the Maui Fire Department, as well as the Maui Police Department (MPD), were also in attendance. When inquired on his stance on the matter, MPD Chief Tivoli Faaumu stated, “I believe in the cause, it is very important that we treat everyone equally—there are so many domestic violence cases nationwide, in our county and in the State of Hawaii. The Maui Police Department is here to represent, and show our support.”
Excellent hawaiian style button up ss shirt with chest pocket. Pit to pit is 28.5″ with 32″ length from back collar seam to hem. Its in great condition. Ask any questions… USA buyers only. Thanks for looking!
In 17 Open, it was Madfrog 17 Blue sweeping past MN Select 17-1, 25-23, 26-24, for the title. Madfrog lost one all weekend, to Hanahou 17-1 on Day 2. MN Select was undefeated until running into Madfrog in the final.
We believe choosing clothes is a personal thing – and so is our approach to service. That’s why we created The GANT Lounge. We offer personalized 1-on-1 time with an experienced stylist to walk you through the best of GANT.
Our lessons are carefully crafted to include current events, vocabulary usage, celebrities, popular culture, and so-on. While grammar may not change, we know that the nuances of the language change all the time, which is why we release new content every single week.
The little fish discovered by deep divers in 300 feet of water off Kure Atoll is likely to be called Tosanoides obama, in honor of President Obama’s decision to expand the monument’s boundaries (though it won’t be made official …until later this year). It’s the endemic Hawaiian fish is the first member of the Tosanoides genus to be discovered beyond Japan.

“kahi e hui ai kaʻoihana”

No holes or stains! Pre-owned men’s Old Navy XL windbreaker with full zip. Navy blue with orange collar and orange and white front zipper. Two front zip pockets, two inner pockets, and grommets under the arms for ventilation.
A wela nā pōhaku, kīpapa ʻia nā pōhaku ma lalo o ka imu a ma hope o kēlā, ua wikiwiki loa ka hana.  I ia manawa, laulima mākou no ka nui o ka hana a no ka wikiwiki.  Hoʻokomo ʻia nā pā kini ʻiʻo, ka pūmaiʻa i kīhaehae ʻia, ka lau maiʻa, ka lāʻī, nā ʻekemauʻu, a laila ke kapolina i ʻole e pakele aku ka māhu.  A hoʻomaha ihola mākou.
1  ¶  E mililani aku iā Iēhova, e kāhea aku hoʻi i kona inoa;     E hōʻike aku hoʻi i kāna mau hana i waena o nā kānaka. 2 E ʻoli aku iā ia, e hoʻoleʻa aku iā ia;     E hoʻokaulana aku i kāna mau hana a pau. 3 E kaena ʻoukou ma kona inoa hoʻāno,     E leʻaleʻa hoʻi ka naʻau o ka poʻe ʻimi iā Iēhova. 4 E huli ʻoukou iā Iēhova, a me kona ikaika;     E ʻimi mau loa aku hoʻi i kona maka. 5 E hoʻomanaʻo i nā hana mana āna i hana ai,     A me kāna mau mea kupanaha,     A me ka hoʻoponopono ʻana o kona waha: 6 E nā pua a ʻAberahama, a kāna kauwā,     E nā mamo a Iakoba, kona mea i wae ai. 7 ʻO ia nō ʻo Iēhova, ko kākou Akua:     Aia ma ka honua a pau kāna hoʻoponopono ʻana. 8  ¶  Ua hoʻomanaʻo mau mai ʻo ia i kona berita,     I ka ʻōlelo hoʻi āna i kauoha mai ai i nā hanauna, he tausani;
Hele mai ʻo Kawelo-mahamaha-iʻa mai Kauaʻi mai a kū i luna o Konahuanui a nānā mai i lalo nei. Kīloi mai ʻo ia i ka ihe makawalu a kū i lalo o ka honua a huʻe i ka lepo a me ka pōhaku. A kapa ʻia ka inoa o kēia wahi ʻo “Kūkaʻōʻō.” Manaʻo ʻia, aia ma loko o Kūkaʻōʻō kahi i kū ai kā Kawelo ihe ʻōʻō. Mai luna mai o ka heiau, ʻike ʻia ka mānoa maoli o nei awāwa ʻo Mānoa a me ke kahe pono ʻana o ka wai mai uka mai. Ua koho pono ʻo Kawelo i kona wahi e waiho ai i kāna ihe ʻōʻō.
After getting our malasadas at the bakery across the street from this restaurant, we came here for lunch, and met the cream pie and carrot cake offerings in the case on our way in! Now we had to plan a smaller lunch so we could…More
The Women’s March On Washington is a perfect example of how a large movement can originate from somewhere small, in this case, our own island of Maui. Hana grandmother Teresa Shook first created the event on Facebook following the election. Unhappy with the results, she invited 40 of her friends to march in Washington D.C. to express their frustration. When Shook awoke in the morning, her Facebook event had 10,000 additional names of people interested in participating in the march. Shook never imagined those 10,000 names would turn into an estimated 500,000 people marching in Washington D.C. and over 600 marches around the world.
Makaʻāinana persevered during this period of change. They not only learned to read and write—making Hawaiʻi one of the most literate countries in the world— they also published and disseminated knowledge. More than 100 million pages of printed material were written in part by makaʻāinana. Their efforts have preserved much of our national narratives, mele, and moʻolelo.
1st Character 2nd Character Aoki Aoki Sayaka Audio Blog lesson Beat Takeshi brand burando comedians COMME des GARCONS dake dansei English Hello episode of Yuri’s Expansion Section fasshon geinin Hachimangu Harajuku hito hodo hōgen hyōjun-go izakaya Izumo Taisha Japan Japanese Audio Blog Japanese comedy jinja Kana Kanji Close-up Kanji Kanojo Kansai dialect Kansai region kansaiben kara Kare katsuyaku Kiyomizu Temple Koko kon’nichiwa Kono Kore koto mo kotoba kyabakura Kyō Line-By-Line Transcript manzai mata Meiji Shrine mono nado naka naru Nihon Nikkō Tōshōgū ninki nitsuite o-hanashi nitsuite o-hanashishimashita nitsuite o-hanashishimasu niwa number o-hanashi shimashita o-warai ōdio burogu deshita ōdio burogu desu ōku Omoide omoimasu owarai RED BAR Romaji Romaji Mina-san Sayaka Sayaka Aoki Shibuya shimasu shita shite imasu shōchō shōryaku standardized Japanese suru Today Tōkyō Vocabulary List Kanji Watashi yatai yobareru yūjin yūmei Yuri no ōdio Yuri’s audio blog Yuri’s いかがでしたか それでは、また ひらがなばんみなさん、こんにちは ユリのオーディオブログです 漢字版
Kūlana: Kihana nui, Kiʻi nui a me ka māmā kukui, Māmoku lua, E hoʻoukuhi i ka lima Kikokikona Kīpokā kaha Mākaukau kūpiki kaha Ka mea hiki ke kūpikipiki Ke kaha o ka mīkini ka ea Mokulele o ka mokulele Ka hoʻohanaʻana i ka hoʻonaʻauaoʻOihana kaumaha …
The definition he shared for ‘āina as place has always struck me as being concisely intuitive and easy to remember. He said that ‘sense of place’ involves both the feel of a place, and the feel for a place. He taught us that place is personally defined for people by their own “locational experiences,” bridging of and for. He urged our business team to open our company with a spirit of hospitality creating fertile ground for stakeholders to gain place-connected experiences while they were involved with us. They could then feel for themselves what the Aloha spirit was all about, of and for. He explained this as key to being “culturally correct” in the way we shared Hawai‘i with visitors as well: A guest experience could be a locational experience too.
Soon they may be able to do just that. Captain Miki and his crew plan to hold sailing demonstrations during their stay in Lata, and invite local people to join them. They hope to encourage residents of other islands to build and sail their own voyaging canoes.
RATED  Stopped for breakfast here on Wednesday: Farmers Market Day in Na’alehu, Hawaii. Ordered the breakfast bowl which was terrific. Thinly sliced fried spuds, topped with spinach, mushrooms, egg and melted cheese on top. Yum! Not cheap at 9 bucks, but if you know anything about Hawaii, food is very expensive here. Followed up with a slice of Macadamia Nut Cream Pie. Very good.
We visited on Valentine’s day so the restaurant was serving a special menu. I got a really delicious pork tenderloin with mashed potatoes and sweet potatoes. All the dinners came with fresh salad and dessert. My husband got a pasta dish that was so substantial…More
After opening a successful boutique store in Glades Shopping Centre, Bromley, we now offer our customers a platform to buy their favourite urban wear, online. As a growing contemporary urban menswear brand, we offer the height of fashion at an affordable price. Everything we sell has been manufactured in the finest factories and designed exclusively for NA Menswear. So if you’re looking for something unique, you’ve come to the right place.
A great resource for students of traditional Hawaiian dance, this beautiful handbook filled with archival photographs covers the origins, language, etiquette, ceremonies, and the spiritual culture of hula. Hula, the indigenous dance of Hawai’i, preserves significant aspects of Native Hawaiian culture with strong ties to health and spirituality. Kumu Hula, persons who culturally recognized hula experts and educators, maintain and share this cultural tradition, conveying Hawaiian history and spiritual beliefs in this unique form of cultural and creative expression, comprising specific controlled rhythmic movements that enhance the meaning and poetry of the accompanying songs.
ʻŌiwi TV produces top-quality documentaries, news and multimedia content from a uniquely Hawaiian perspective. The wisdom, beauty and power of Hawai‘i are the backdrop to the most important and interesting narratives of our generation. Founded by Nāʻālehu Anthony, Keoni Lee, and Amy Kalili, this next generation of Native Hawaiian storytellers aim to tell the stories of our land and our people.
Literally translated, Nānā i ke kumu means ‘look to your source’ recognizing an inner wellspring inside each and every one of us. We look within, and self reflect to get healthy, in body, mind and spirit. This is one’s wellspring of identity and intuition, intellect and emotion, values and beliefs, lessons learned and ancestral knowledge, all personal and professional alike.
Traditional Hula is a sacred dance expressed through the entire “beingness” of the dancer. Kumu Mahea has shared her workbook to ground the dancer in Hawaiian history, language, song, ritual, and ceremony of this age-old culture. A scholar and an artist, she offers an introduction for serious study based on the wisdom passed on from her teachers, an honor to the rich legacy of Hawai’i.
It wasn’t until Keoua started learning his ʻōlelo makuahine tht he realized that it was his responsibilit to perpetuate those skills that his kūpuna possessed lest they be lost. Unfortunately it was too late to learn from his grand-mother as her hands were not as nimble and her eyesight slowly faded.
I think this is a good olelo noeau because I look up to my kumu or kupuna. I can connect to this because I learned math from my teachers. I also can connect to this because my parent teach me stuff to. That is how I can connect.
NEGATIVE   Like others have stated, the BBQ pork is good, ask for a side of their BBQ sauce, bc you’ll want more; it’s yummy. Comes with homemade sweetroll bun. Their duch apple pie is good too. Music on Sat night. 50’s diner style with a Hawaiian flair.

“pehea lā e loaʻa ai iaʻu kahi papa hana kiʻi”

Nā Ponohula workshop registrations REQUIRE purchase of KAHOH registration. You may purchase Nā Ponohula registration at the same time of KAHOH registration. If purchasing Nā Ponohula registration on behalf of others, ensure that they also have purchased KAHOH registration. Limited availability.
Before British rule Lashio was also the centre of authority for the northern Shan States, but the Burmese post in the valley was close to the Nam Yao, in an old Chinese fortified camp. The Lashio valley was formerly very populous; but a rebellion, started by the sawbwa of Hsenwi, about ten years before the British occupation, ruined it.[1]
Our August/September issue has arrived! Inside you’ll hear from incredible women taking on the world of big wave surfing, travel through the striking landscapes of Ka Lae, get a behind the scenes look at the company throwing many of Hawai‘i’s biggest lu‘au and much, much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
Brand: Old Navy Size: XL Color: Neon Yellow Style: Wnidbreaker active wear jacket with zip hoodie Armpit To Armpit: 25 in/ 63 cm Length:20 in/ 76 cm Thank you for looking Description in the picture all measurements are taken flat
Visit us on Facebook Opens external link to page that may not meet accessibility guidelines Visit us on Twitter Opens external link to page that may not meet accessibility guidelines Visit us on Instagram Opens external link to page that may not meet accessibility guidelines Visit us on YouTube Opens external link to page that may not meet accessibility guidelines
Jade Willis is a knowledgeable fashionista and an absolute terror. Please forgive her spelling and superfluous use of the letter “u” – she’s English. Follow her fashion musings at https://www.facebook.com/Mayojaydesign/ or on Twitter at @MayoJayDesign.
In Hawaiian culture, featherwork was a sign of mana (spiritual prestige) and status. Feather cloaks, helmets, and lei were worn only by chiefs and thousands of feathers were gathered from native birds to create these symbols of Hawaiian royalty and power. They were passed down from generation to generation, warriors would seize cloaks and helmets from defeated rivals, and feather items were given as gifts to convey favor . . .
Welcome to nānā pono! This small corner of the virtual world is concerned primarily with the breathtaking diversity of cultural constructions and expressions of personhood around the globe. In particular, we will focus on sex roles, gender norms, emotional display rules, socialization rituals and the embodied experience of integrating all of these disparate threads into the complex tapestry of personhood.
Inā makemakeʻoe i kahi smartwatch me ke kiʻekiʻe loa o ka puʻuwai o ka naʻau, he mea maikaʻi kēia no ka hoʻolālāʻana i kahi puʻupuʻu kūikawā mai o Samsung, kahi mea nui i hoʻohālikelikeʻia i nā mea akamai loa ma ke kahua kūʻai.
My uncle, Capt Richard Haller, made beautiful feather lei hat bands.  He bought his supplies from Aunty Mary Lou’s and I believe sold some through the shop. Sorry to say he died on Nov 23, 2010, with one lei partially completed in his  Thanks to all there for kindnesses to him.  His sister misses him.
Ma mua o ka luʻu ʻana i ka hana o ka hālāwai, ua wehe ʻia ka hālāwai ma ke oli ʻana iā A Luna Au o Maunaloa, kekahi mele no ke Aliʻi Luka Keanolani Kanāhoahoa Keʻelikōlani, nona ka inoa o ke koleke ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi.  He mea mau ka hula pū ʻana i ia mele me nā kālāʻau.  He mele oli ia i oli ʻia no ka lōkahi ʻana o nā manaʻo, o nā kuanaʻike ma mua o ka luʻu piha ʻana i ke kūkākūkā ʻana.
Therefore, when I hear the phrase Nānā i ke kumu, I know I must consider my emotional sense of place as well as my intellectual honesty and reasoning. In this regard, I am no different from most within our Hawai‘i communities, whether they be keiki o ka ‘āina, kama‘āina, or malihini. Each person has a connection to this place; all have deliberately chosen to be here.
I love Na Lima Mili Hulu Noeau.  I have been taking lei hulu (feather lei) classes in California for years and have been hearing about Aunty Paulette and Aunty Mary Lou all this time.  I had the privilege of meeting Aunty Mary Lou a couple of years ago.  She showed us around the shop, “talking story” with us about family and could identify the maker of each lei she had in her shop, taking particular care to point out the intricate stitch work.  Time flew by and we didn’t actually get a chance for a lesson, but we must have been there for at least a couple of hours anyway!  
At the shoreline of Honokōhau, Kaupo‘ohiwi, a handsome man, finds this beautiful garland (lei) of love and places it upon his shoulders. Encouraged to find the creator of this lei, he journeyed upland to Hualālai.

“hana hale lole hou”

The Student Leadership Development Program at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo recognizes the contributions students have made in their formal and informal leadership roles on campus and acknowledge those individuals who show strong evidence of future leadership potential. The Student Leadership Development Program located in Campus Center is based upon native Hawaiian cultural values of Ka Lama Ku and “Leading with Aloha.”
Iʻelua pule i hala aku nei ua noi mai koʻu hoaaloha iaʻu e nānā i kēia pūnaewele. Ma hope o 3 mau lā ma hope o ke komoʻana i ka pūnaewele ua loaʻa iaʻu kahiʻoihana! I kēia manawa, ke kau nei au i ka papahana pūnaewele kaulana a no ka loaʻaʻana o nā kālā e uku ai no koʻu hale iho! Paipai wau i nā mea a pau e ho’āʻo i kēia,ʻo ia ka maikaʻi! ʻO ke kākoʻo a me ka lawelaweʻoihana ke poʻo o ka laina.
A kokoke ‘o ia i ka puka pā o ka u’i āna e li’a nei, ‘ike akula ‘o ia iā Helena e noho ana ma waho o ka lānai, i ka ‘ike ‘ana mai nō ho’i ‘o Helena iā ia, ani maila ‘o ia i kona lima me ka mūkī ‘ana a’e i ka waha, a pe’ape’ahi maila me ke kuhikuhi ‘ana mai e iho i ke kaona a ho’i aku ma laila, i ke ano o ke ahiahi.
Men’s fashion can be simple, sleek and straightforward, or inventive and daring. Whatever direction you choose to take, you’ll find the building blocks of a deep and versatile wardrobe in this selection of men’s apparel. Having great style is about matching your personality and attitude with your clothing. From matched suits all the way down to socks, you’ll find amazing designs that allow you to feel comfortable and look great. You’ll be amazed at the variety of chic outfits you can make with a blazer, a few solid button down shirts and an excellent pair of pants from this collection. Dive into this large selection and find your next best look today.
Service was great but food was lacking. Mac salad was eh. The noodles were undercooked and sat atop a pile of shredded lettuce which I could have done without. I had the chicken Katsu which was soggy on the bottom, the dipping sauce was good however. My fiancé enjoyed his loco moco and particularly liked the gravy that was on it. Given the choice I probably wouldn’t go back except the desserts looked good and service was great.
I kekahi lā mai, ma hope o ka ʻumikūmālua hola i loko o ka imu, ua liuliu.  Huʻe ʻia ka imu, wehe i nā mea o loko, a hoʻomaka koke i ke kīhaehae ʻana i ka ʻiʻo.  ʻAʻole lua e like ai me kēia ʻano hana me nā hoapapa a he ala hou aku ia i hoʻoikaika ai nā pilina ma waena o nā ʻelele Nāaoloa ma o ka hana kuʻuna.
Ch.6 p.35 para.7 sent.2 Nānā akula lākou, e kū mai ana nō nā hale o Kauakahialiʻi mā; e heʻe nalu mai ana nō hoʻi nā kamaʻāina. and saw Kauakahialii’s houses standing there and the people the place out surf riding.
ʻO nā mea a mākou i loaʻa ma kēia smartwatch he mea kūpono ia no ka poʻe e makemake e hoʻomaka i ka hana maʻamau a iʻole e makemake ana e mālama i nāʻano likeʻole: Ma kahi o ka heleʻana, kahi helu helu, ka puʻuwai.
Peheaʻoe makemake e kākau maʻalahi i ka home, hana i nā hola hoʻolālā, hoʻonohonoho i kāu hoʻonohonoho pono’ī, e hoʻonui i ka manawa me kouʻohana a me nā hoaaloha, a loaʻa kahi uku momona maikaʻi ma ka hopena o ka malama?
The challenge is heightened when one considers the tragic period of the population death spiral when Hawaiians, absent immunity from western diseases, died by the hundreds of thousands. Within a very short period of time the population decreased by more than 80%.  Because so much of our history was based on oral tradition there was a dramatic loss of Hawaiian knowledge and history that died with the people.
OK its finally happening Taco Tita will expand hours by popular demand..Starting Monday August 28th the Tita will be open from 11 to 6:30 . You can pick up your dinner on the way home…no cook tonight We will try everyday till 6:30 and see how it goes. So every day 11 to 6:30 …EAT MORE MEXICAN>>>LIVE LONGER…see you there
Iā Kauhi e iho ana i kai, lohe ʻia aʻela ʻo ia i ke oli ʻana mai o Kahalaopuna ma hope ona. Pēlā ʻo ia i ʻike ai, ua ola hou ʻo Kahalaopuna. No laila, piʻi hou aʻela ʻo ia i uka no ka pepehi hou ʻana i kāna wahine uʻi. Ua hili hou akula ʻo ia i ke poʻo o Kahalaopuna i ka ʻāhui hala a make. Kanu hou ihola ʻia kona kino i ka lepo a haʻalele akula iā Mānoa. Hoʻōla hou ihola ke akua pueo iā Kahalaopuna i ka hoʻi ʻana o Kauhi i kai. A oli hou akula ʻo Kahalaopuna i ke mele no Kauhi.
H folks today Monday we are featuring THE CUBAN sandwich . It has become a popular item all around. Also sharing the lime light is our great French Dip. Who knows what else Mona will be cooking up HUNGRY??? come on and have a bite with us
Wow we have a new kitchen. Finally drug off that ancient stove and replaced it with modern equipment. What a relief Now we heat up the food not the entire universe. New bakers oven also so get ready for some new treats coming soon. Good things in the future for the Hou. See you soon Aloha Patty

“a me ka nui o nā kiʻi i hanaʻia”

Hana Hou! maintains extensive archives which include back issues going back as far as 2002 (Volume 5) on its website.[8][9] While complimentary copies are provided on all Hawaiian Airlines flights, the magazine is also marketed at newsstands in Hawaii and by subscription.[6]
I think this is a good olelo noeau because I look up to my kumu or kupuna. I can connect to this because I learned math from my teachers. I also can connect to this because my parent teach me stuff to. That is how I can connect.
Keoua states, “it makes me very happy to see the joy in my grandmother’s eyes when I share the pieces that I have woven with her. We now talk a different language, a lauhala weaver’s language, when she offers her advice or new techniqes to consider. While her hands are not able to teach, she is quick to scold when I am not doing something correct or to point out an error.”
Learn to make different styles of lei using native flora.  Participants will learn proper protocol for  picking plants for their lei. This huakaʻi may include a visit to various sites to gather plants Nā Ponohula participants will also learn an oli or hula to accompany the making of lei.
For one of the best dining experiences on the Big Island, you can’t pass up an opportunity to grab a bite at Hana Hou Restaurant! Whether you’re in the mood for one of our grab-and-go sandwiches or you’re ready to sit down and feast on some good old-fashioned comfort food, we’ve got just the menu for you. Try one of our signature entrées like the Loco Moco or Hogzilla Burrito, or opt for one of our mouth watering gluten free or vegetarian dishes, like our amazing vegetarian stir fry. We guarantee that no matter what you choose to dine on, your taste buds will be delighted!
E hoʻolako ana ke koho o ko Hilo Huakaʻi Kālai i nā kipa honua a me kekahi ʻaha e pili ana i ka hoʻoili ʻana i ka ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi ma ka lumi papa ma ka “nānā ʻana i ke kumu” ʻo ia ka ʻīkoi o ka hoʻōla ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi ʻana.
Ch.27 p.145 para.6 sent.1 “I nānā aku auaneʻi ʻoe, ka ʻelemakule e loloa ana ka lauoho, ua hina ke poʻo, ʻo Moanalihaikawaokele nō ia. “When you see an old man with long gray hair, that is Moanalihaikawaokele;
We love this restaurant, we went to eat there two years ago when we were on vacation and just had to go again on this vacation. The food is yummy and the service is friendly. If you like good desserts… you have to try some from Hana Hou because they are so tasty. See More
I ia lā a‘e, ua hā‘awi aku ‘o Kalei i ka mo‘olelo iā Leialoha. Ua hau‘oli ‘o Leialoha a ua hele aku ‘o ia i ka papa. ‘A‘ole ‘o ia i mahalo iā Kalei. Mākonā, ‘eā? I ka papa, ua makemake ‘o Leialoha e heluhelu i ka mo‘olelo i ke kāne u‘i. Ua mana‘o ‘o ia, “Inā ho‘olohe ke kāne i ka‘u mo‘olelo, e mana‘o ana ‘o ia akamai au.” No laila, ua hele wāwae ‘o Leialoha ma mua o ka papa a ua heluhelu i ka mo‘olelo. Ua ho‘omaopopo aku ‘o ia, he ‘ōpala ka mo‘olelo! Ua nānā wale aku nā haumāna iā Leialoha. Ma hope iho, ua ‘aka‘aka a ho‘ohenehene aku nā haumāna iā Leialoha. Ua ‘ōlelo aku ke kāne u‘i, “Hūpō kēlā wahine. ‘Oi aku ka hūpō ona ma mua o nā wāhine ‘ē a‘e!”
Aia a’e nei ma luna ke po’oinoa o ku’u wahi kolamu, ‘o ia ho’i, ‘o Haku ‘Ōhi’a. He inoa kēia no ka luna ki’i o nā kalepa Kū ma ko kākou mau Luakini aloha. He mau mana’o ‘oko’a pū nō na’e ko kēia mau hua’ōlelo. Ua kapa ‘ia ka ‘i’o a me nā ‘ano’ano o ka ipu he Haku Ipu. I hua’ōlelo ‘o Haku e hō’ike ai i ke ‘ano o kekahi mea, i ke ‘ano o loko ona. ‘O ka na’au paha ka Haku o ke kanaka.
“Aia a hora ‘umi, hele mai ‘oe a ma ka pukaaniani ma ka ‘ao’ao ma ‘Ewa o ka hale, ‘o ko’u rumi ia, komo mai ‘oe ma laila, no laila e ho’i ‘āwīwī aku ‘oe, i ‘ole e ‘ike ‘ia mai, a ua lohe akula ‘oe i ke kauoha, e ho’omana’o mai ho’i ‘oe ia leo.”
In Hawaiian culture, featherwork was a sign of mana (spiritual prestige) and status. Feather cloaks, helmets, and lei were worn only by chiefs and thousands of feathers were gathered from native birds to create these symbols of Hawaiian royalty and power. They were passed down from generation to generation, warriors would seize cloaks and helmets from defeated rivals, and feather items were given as gifts to convey favor . . .
Nānā I ke Kumu is a meaningful olelo no’eau. To different people, it has a different meaning. To me it means to always look where the knowlage is. Or pay attention to your teachings and teachers. Anyone can be a teacher to you. To me, as long as you learn something from a person, the person was a teacher. If you learn something from an experience, that was a teaching. Learn as much wisdom you can and live life smart!
Nā Ponohula workshops are active and hands-on.  They are designed for adults, minimum 18 years of age.  Nā Ponohula workshops are available for Ka ʻAha Hula ʻO Hālauaola registrants only. There are special requirements for participants in the Kāʻekeʻeke and ʻOhe Hano Ihu and Lauhala Preparation Workshops which will include two nights residency in Waipiʻo Valley. Some sites may not be wheelchair accessible.  Class size is limited to 20 participants.  All Nā Ponohula participants are expected to participate in the Hōʻike on June 23, 2018, Saturday.
“ʻO kēia ka lua o ka ʻaha aʻo kūloko e mālama ʻia nei. ʻO ka mua, ua mālama ʻia i kēlā makahiki kula aku nei, i ka wā nō i hahana loa ai ke kūpale ʻana iā Maunakea”, i ʻōlelo ai ʻo Hiapo Perreira, he polopeka no Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani ma ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo. Me ke kākoʻo o ke kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo i mālama ʻia ai he ʻaha hou me ke kumuhana ʻo ka paio kālaimanaʻo; he mākau a haʻawina i ʻike ʻia mai loko mai o nā hanana e kū nei no ke kūkulu ʻohe nānā ʻana ma Maunakea. Wahi a Perreira, “No laila, he ʻaha aʻo kūloko ma ke ʻano hoʻi e nānā hou aku ai i ka ʻike; pehea kākou e ʻike nei i ka ʻike, a pehea e hoʻohana nei i kēlā ʻike.”
Ka Hoʻolauna – Haumāna will introduce themselves using their hoʻolauna speech previously practiced in fourth grade.  This will include stating their full names, where they are from, where they live, who their parents are, where they go to school, which grade level they are in, and the name of their present classroom teacher.
Ch.22 p.115 para.5 sent.2 E nānā naʻe ʻoe a i kū ka pūnohu i ka moana, a laila, manaʻo aʻe ʻoe ua hoʻi mai wau me ko wahine. Keep watch, and if the mist rises on the ocean, then you will know that I am returning with your wife,
With clothes for men from this collection, you’ll feel attractive and confident. Take on the boardroom or barroom knowing that you look your best. Elevate your wardrobe with new clothes and start realizing fashionable new possibilities.
Ch.27 p.145 para.7 sent.1 “Kali aku ʻoe a moe, e huli ana ke alo i lalo, ʻaʻole i moe, akā, i nānā aku ʻoe a i huli ke alo i luna, ua moe kā hoʻi, a laila, hele aku ʻoe. “Wait until he is asleep; should be turn his face down he is not asleep, but when you see him with the face turned up, he is really asleep;
Therefore, when I hear the phrase Nānā i ke kumu, I know I must consider my emotional sense of place as well as my intellectual honesty and reasoning. In this regard, I am no different from most within our Hawai‘i communities, whether they be keiki o ka ‘āina, kama‘āina, or malihini. Each person has a connection to this place; all have deliberately chosen to be here.
Hey Oahu people don’t forget, fashion show this Sunday! Kahala Mall at 1:00p and then trunk show @richeskahala to follow. There the entire Sonny Ching Collection will have a special discount. And one-of-a-kind and limited edition pieces featured in the fashion show will be for sale. #nottobemissed #sonnychingcollection #hoololi #paradisusjewelry #happyholiday #seeyouthere
Uaʻike wau ua lilo kēia i kekahi o nā ala maʻalahi a me kaʻoluʻolu e hoʻolilo ai i ke kālā i kēia mau lā, e like me nā kānaka me kaʻikeʻole i ka moʻolelo. ʻIke au i kēiaʻoihana maʻalahi, hiki a maʻalahi. Makemake wau e hoʻonui aku i ka manawa me koʻuʻohana a me ke kauʻana me nā hoaaloha, a ke loaʻa nei ka wā no kaʻu mau hana’ē aʻe. ʻOi, nui loa ka uku. ʻAʻohe mea e manaʻo e hanaʻoe ma ka home me kāu uku! Hiki iāʻoe ke loaʻa kēia ola. E hoʻomaka me kēia ma kaomiʻana i kahi.
Wow we have a new kitchen. Finally drug off that ancient stove and replaced it with modern equipment. What a relief Now we heat up the food not the entire universe. New bakers oven also so get ready for some new treats coming soon. Good things in the future for the Hou. See you soon Aloha Patty
Since 1940, Hana Hou Restaurant has been offering tasty, homemade comfort food and desserts, with signature dishes that you won’t find anywhere else! Call us today for take-out or rent one of our motel rooms and enjoy our local diner. We welcome gluten-free and vegetarian guests!
The ʻIpu Heke is a double gourd implement used in Hula. Participants will learn about the importance and meaning of the ʻIpu Heke and will make and learn to play their implement. Nā Ponohula participants will learn a hula or oli for the Ipu Heke.
Great local spot! Stopped here tonight on our way back down to Kona from the volcano. Good food, great service, even had some live music! Our kids highly recommend the chocolate cream pie and passion fruit lemonade
Hoʻomaka ka hui mua i ka ʻaoʻao hema o ka hale, noho i ka pā mauʻu o ka “White Garden”, a hoʻolohe i ka moʻolelo no Kahalapuna. Ma hope, piʻi i ke alahele a puka i ka “arbor”. Ma laila e kuhikuhi ai iā Akaka, Nālehuaoakaka, ka ua Tuahine, ka makani Kahaukani, ke kualono ʻo Waʻahila kahi e moe ana ʻo Kauhi, a me ke ākea o ke awāwa.
A laila, ua hoʻomaka kēlā me kēia pūʻulu o nā pūʻulu ʻehā i kekahi haʻiʻōlelo/hōʻikeʻike no nā mea a mākou i manaʻo ai he kōkua no ka maʻa ʻana i ka moʻomeheu Kepanī iā mākou ma laila.  Ua like nā kumuhana o nā pūʻulu me ke Kumu Honua Mauli Ola:  pili ʻuhane, lawena, ʻōlelo, a me ka ʻike kuʻuna.
A great resource for students of traditional Hawaiian dance, this beautiful handbook filled with archival photographs covers the origins, language, etiquette, ceremonies, and the spiritual culture of hula. Hula, the indigenous dance of Hawai’i, preserves significant aspects of Native Hawaiian culture with strong ties to health and spirituality. Kumu Hula, persons who are culturally recognized hula experts and educators, maintain and share this cultural tradition, conveying Hawaiian history and spiritual beliefs in this unique form of cultural and creative expression, comprising specific controlled rhythmic movements that enhance the meaning and poetry of the accompanying songs.
Kupuna Olivera—He aha nā ʻōlelo a Kupuna Olivera no ke ʻano o ka ʻāina ma Waikīkī? Ma mua, nui ka wai, ke kalo, a me ka laiki ma Waikīkī akā i kēia manawa, nui nā hale a me nā alanui. Ua kūkulu ʻia nā hale, ua hoʻopiha nā kahawai/pūnāwai/ muliwai, a ua ʻeli ʻia ka Ala Wai. Pehea ʻo Mānoa? Ua loli ka ʻāina ma ʻaneʻi kekahi? ʻAe.
Peheaʻoe makemake e kākau maʻalahi i ka home, hana i nā hola hoʻolālā, hoʻonohonoho i kāu hoʻonohonoho pono’ī, e hoʻonui i ka manawa me kouʻohana a me nā hoaaloha, a loaʻa kahi uku momona maikaʻi ma ka hopena o ka malama?
I am using this and Vol 1 as reference as I write a fiction novel which includes reference to old Hawaii traditions. This is one of books recommended by native academics for reliability, as I try to write a piece that might also be enjoyed by Big Island natives as well as euro-American-haoles.
Carrying nets were essential items for storing, protecting and transporting clothing, lei, food and various household items in ancient times. Students will learn to make the basic piko (base/naval), hānai (body of the net), ʻalihi (cords that attach the hānai to the handles) and pū (handles).  Participants will also learn a simple Mele Pule (prayer chant) specific to this art form.

“hana ka mea nui nova”

My husband and I came here almost 11 years ago. They were so friendly and so helpful. We had the privilege of meeting Aunty Paulette, who was a beautiful woman. We felt blessed to learn more about the art of making feather leis, and we hope to visit in the near future so our girls can take a class. We highly recommend this family business.
2371 ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ke kāne, ʻo Pōʻeleʻi ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki ʻakena a haʻanui. Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the husband, Pōʻeleʻi (Supreme-dark-one) the wife; a child born to them is a boaster and an exaggerator.
Makaʻāinana often were referred to as “kupa o ka ʻāina,” those familiar with the land. Kupa describes the close relationship that makaʻāinana had with their specific ʻāina. This relationship is a product of decades of living on, cultivating, and being nourished by that land. This close relationship allowed makaʻāinana to perform their tasks efficiently.
Activities of the Hale Kuamoʻo include the publication of instructional materials in Hawaiian, in-service teacher training and the preparation of examinations in Hawaiian. In addition, the center produces and distributes literature for radio, television, telecommunications, newspapers and other related arts and media in Hawaiian. It is also a leader in the preservation of Hawaiian through research and the production of dictionaries and grammar terminology.
(The Taco Tita person was very friendly though. She apologized for the inconvenience and explained why there was this no-taking-your-food-next-door policy, even though the restaurants are owned by the same owner.)
Pili ka ʻāina mai uka a i kai a pili nō hoʻi ka ʻāina a me ke kai ma muli o ke kahe ʻana mai o ka wai, no laila, pili ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike ʻo Mānoa Heritage me Ka Papa Loʻi ʻo Kānewai a me ka Hale Hōʻikeʻike Iʻa o Waikīkī.
Looking to the source of a living Hawaiian cultural identity links us to the purposes of traditional knowledge, behavior, spirituality and language, that are the basic principles directing the Hawaiian language revitalization program of the Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language Consortium at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. This alliance consists of school programs from infant-toddler, preschool, elementary, intermediate, high school, university and the ʻImiloa Astronomy Center.
Stumbled across this place after checking out the fabled Green Sand Beach. It was a mid afternoon lunch so it wasn’t crowded during our lunch. I’d been dying to try the Hawaiian meal called the Loco Moco. I decided this was my opportunity and asked…More
Carrying nets were essential items for storing, protecting and transporting clothing, lei, food and various household items in ancient times. Students will learn to make the basic piko (base/naval), hānai (body of the net), ʻalihi (cords that attach the hānai to the handles) and pū (handles).  Participants will also learn a simple Mele Pule (prayer chant) specific to this art form.
Congratulations to HUGS board member Bill Tobin, owner/managing partner of Tiki’s Grill & Bar, who was inducted into the Hawaii Restaurant Association’s Hall of… Fame last night at Pōmaika’i Ballrooms. He was one of 10 restaurateurs, chefs and industry pioneers who have contributed to Hawaii’s culinary scene. Hats off also to HUGS board member Anne Lee who chaired the Gala, that featured a delicious Chefs of Aloha Dine Around.
I ke kokoke ‘ana mai o kēlā keiki, ma kahi a Helena e kū nei, ua ‘ōlelo ho’opā’ani maila ‘o ia iā Helena: “E ka U’i o ke ano ahiahi, e naue paha kāua ma kai o ka Nekina e ‘ike i ka huikau o ke kaona!”
I ka ‘ike ‘ana ‘o Hōlanikū (ka inoa o kēia kanaka), i kēia leka, ia wā ‘o ia i ‘ōlelo aku ai i ka makuahine: “Ke kauoha mai nei ‘o kua’ana ia’u, e holo aku e ho’oponopono i nā wahi ‘ōpala o hope, a he ‘ōma’ima’i ‘o ia.”
In 17 Open, it was Madfrog 17 Blue sweeping past MN Select 17-1, 25-23, 26-24, for the title. Madfrog lost one all weekend, to Hanahou 17-1 on Day 2. MN Select was undefeated until running into Madfrog in the final.
Aunty Paulette, Aunty Mary Lou, and Mele have a huge place in Hawaiian history, because they have contributed so much to the preservation of the talent for feather lei making. The talent and aloha of… these two icon oozes out when you go and visit their shop on Kapahulu Avenue.
I don’t know if they slipped something in my iced tea or what, but every single thing they served us was absolutely delicious.  We had to wait a while to get our food as the dining room was full with only one server and it looked like one woman in the kitchen, but when the food finally came out it was delicious.  One of the side orders was bean salad and I almost didn’t touch it because … bean salad.  But it was the most delicious bean salad I’ver ever eaten.  I’m serious.  I can’t believe I’m raving over bean salad.  I had fish and chips and it was perfect.  They don’t have a deep fryer so the “chips” were potato wedges that were smashed and fried until crispy on the flat-top grill.  Like the bean salad, you would not expect this to be delicious, but it was!  Finally, best pies on the big island.
One aspect highlighted the use of song to make a statement, specifically the mele “Ka Wai a Kāne”. According to ʻIkaʻaka Pang, a Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani student, “Reggae has universal popularity nowadays. Kaʻikena used this popular genre that is often a platform for addressing social issues to give this mele renewed meaning for us today!” Kailihou says that, “We know that understanding and using our Hawaiian language gives us a unique perspective. Using our language to continually recontextualize traditional knowledge for new generations is critical.”
Bio: Dr. Kalani Akana is a Kumu Hula, an ʻuniki graduate of Ka Pā Hula Hawaiʻi under Kahaʻi Topolinski. He continues to teach students the art of oli (chant) as learned from his aunt, Hoʻoulu Richards, Nona Beamer, Kalena Silva, and Edith McKinzie.
Tonight is one of the last times that the class of 2006 will ever sit together as one. We will each be leaving Kamehameha and heading off on our own. 98% of the class — 437 of the 444 students — has chosen to attend either a two- or four-year college next year, two brave individuals have decided to enlist in the military, two classmates have made the choice of entering directly into the “real world” of working adults, and three people have decided to pursue other activities. After we depart from Kōnia field tomorrow morning, we will each head down our individual paths of life. Starting from the same place, the Kamehameha Schools Kapālama Campus, these paths will take us in different directions. Some of our paths will branch out across the globe, while others will remain close to home; some of these paths will cross frequently, while others will not at all. My message tonight is that at some point along our individual paths, we must make a conscientious effort to give back to the Native Hawaiian community.
Spring break is right around the corner! It’s time to fill out the laptop permission form to let us know if your student is turning in their laptop to their advisory class, or keeping their laptop over the break. We’ve been fortunate to have no laptop losses or damages over the breaks in the last few years. Over 50% of student keep their laptops over each break.
Our weekly Hana Hou Paddle and Strum get-togethers are always lots of fun – new friends, food, music, Hawaiian culture, a great paddling workout, learning new skills, a bit of adventure, and lots of aloha on a white sandy beach in Corona del Mar.
Kawika has been an active artist participant in MAMo: Maoli Arts Movement since 2012, and in 2013, was awarded a Master’s Apprenticeship through the Hawaiʻi State State Foundation in the Culture and the Arts with his hulu master, Paullette Kahalepuna (2014 MAMo Awardee, and 2014 ʻŌʻō Awards Recepient). Under this apprenticeship with Paullette, Kawika studied Hawaiian feather work in the forms of lei (adornment), kahili (feather standard), ahuʻula (cape), and mahiʻole (helmets). He also studied works from traditional materials, and how to use, cultivate, and preserve these materials.
Radiologists ana i ka hoʻomanawanui i ka mahalo i ka hopena maikai Oia i mau ai i manaoia i keia ano o ka haʻahaʻa-mahele lāʻau pāhawewe lapaau. Symptoms nui hou me ka nui emi ma ka cough a me ka hanu hou, a me ka hoʻomanawanui noho hana me ka maikai ma Hawaiʻi o ke ola. Mākou manaoio nei i hana i ka hana o ka multimodality Inc o integrative GcMAF eia kekahi me ka haʻahaʻa mahele lāʻau o ka pāhawewe ua lawa ia e hoʻokō, E makaala’na i hoʻoponoponoʻaoʻao hopena o regular kiʻekiʻe-mahele lāʻau pāhawewe. He aha ka oi kahaha ko oukou naau o thatthis hang nei ma ka loa holomua ke kahua i undergone a pau i loaʻa therapies (: e like me chemotherapy) Just I ka ohe. Wurde emi mana e like me ka maʻi ‘aʻai wurde hoʻopale a me ka pilikia i ka pono. I ka hoʻohana ‘ana GcMAF Inc, e ike maikaʻi i nā hualoaʻa me ka i nā kūlana kanaka: e like me ka pāhawewe (E makaala’na i ka iwi lolo) ma systemicʻike mau chemotherapies Ka mea hanaʻino i ka’ōnaehana paleʻea nenoaiu.
“My grandmother arrived on Santa Cruz in a tepuke,” said Wendy Laia. “If I were invited, I would like to sail to honor her memory.” Other people also hoped to learn how to sail these vessels, not only to help revive their ancestral culture, but also because canoes like the tepuke may offer them sustainable alternatives to infrequent and unreliable ship transport.
She was curious to venture with the Kahunanui. We told her what the excursion was about, who the Kahunanui is (which by the way, she guessed who it was from the beginning). She then started to share some of her stories with us- all very informative
Hū ka leʻalea o nā kānaka a pau i ke aʻo ʻana i ka lawena kūpono ma ka ʻai ʻana i laila, keu aku ka ʻike ʻana no ka paʻa ʻana o ke pola laiki ma ka lima i ka wā ʻai holoʻokoʻa.  Ma ka huakaʻi ʻana, he mea paʻakikī nō paha ke kani ʻole o ka waha ke ʻai, ʻoiai he mea maʻamau nā ʻano kani like ʻole o ka waha ma ka ʻai ʻana ma Hawaiʻi nei, keu aku ke ʻono ka meaʻai.
My family was on the big island over Christmas and New Year’s (2017/2018).  This is BY FAR the BEST breakfast we had while on the island!  And the bakery items are to die for!  We live in Alaska and are used to “home-cooking”. This place was perfect for all 8 of us!
2012 Neurologist: ka hoomanawanui i manawa ulu kiʻekiʻe e holumua ai MS. Aia mea i ike pono ka iapaau ana no keia kulana, i ka hoʻomanawanui ua hoʻopaʻaʻia i ka noho huila, aʻaʻole e e hiki ke hele hou.
Mamuli o ka nui o kēlā kuko, ua ho’okō ihola kēia makua kāne kōlea i kona mana’o, pu’uwai ‘ole, a moku a’ela ka piko waiwai ‘ole o kēia kaikamahine, ‘o ia paha ka mea i ‘ōlelo ai kahiko he hānai pua’a, ma loko ka ‘uku. ‘A’ole na’e i ‘ike ka makuahine i kēia mau hana poupou noho ni’o a kāna kāne, a pēlā pū ho’i me kahi māmā o kēia lawakua pohu.
Ch.17 p.87 para.5 sent.2 A lohe akula lākou iā ʻUlili mā i kēia kaua a ka moʻo me ka ʻīlio, a he mea mau naʻe iā ʻAiwohikupua ma ka nānā iā uka. When they heard from Snipe and his companion of this battle between the lizard and the dog, Aiwohikupua looked toward the mountain.
We have, to the best of our ability, provided orthographic editing for the Kuokoa’s original text. In some cases, we have left this text unaltered in deference to what might be termed the “meaningful ambiguity” of certain unmarked words and phrases. We’ve left other passages unaltered in recognition of our inability to properly understand them. The reader is encouraged to form his own conclusions by viewing the original at Ulukau: The Hawaiian Electronic Library. Readers unfamiliar with the sound of ho’āeae are directed to Kalani Akana’s rendition of “Mele Ho’oipoipo” on the CD Nā Kumu Hula, Songs From the Source v.1, SCHH CD-7100.
Good morning…here’s a news flash …Hana Hou will NOT be open Thanksgiving day. We have decided to spend it with our families in the holiday tradition. I thought it was a fitting way to start our holidays as we will be working hard thru Jan 1st. We will be open all the other days like Xmas and New years day. We will close early on New Years Eve however . Grab a turkey and some good friends and get to cooking this way you can enjoy the leftovers. Friday the day after we will be having Hot turkey sandwiches with all the trimmings for those with no leftovers stashed away. Enjoy
Currently his one-man show DUKE is touring throughout the Hawaiian Islands as well as the Continental U.S. Originally produced by Honolulu Theatre for Youth, DUKE is an unforgettable portrayal the life of Olympic gold medalist and father of modern surfing Duke Paoa Kahanamoku.
When Hōlanikū returns to Honolulu, he learns of Helena’s affair from his mother who has, until now, said nothing about what she’s seen through Helena’s open window. Hōlanikū then blames his wife for Helena’s immorality, disclaims all responsibility for his stepdaughter’s “hewa,” and brazenly attempts to renew his secret relationship with the girl. When Helena rejects him, he goes to a poet and commissions a mele ho’āeae that, he hopes, will soothe his anguish and win her affection.

“kahi e hōʻikeʻia ai nā kiʻi kiʻi i loko o Paris”

Maloko o ka makahiki hookahi, elua no wa, o ke Kau, o ka Hooilo, eia no ke Kau, o ka wa e kupono ai ka la, ma luna ponoi o ka mokupuni, a loihi ke ao, a pa mai ka makani Moae, a mahana mai ka po me ke ao, a ulu hou mai na laau a me na laau hihi, oia iho la no ke kau.
Because makaʻāinana worked intimately with the land and the ocean to produce food, clothing, transportation, supplies, and other necessities, they were stewards of the land. Makaʻāinana performed the majority of the critical day-to-day tasks of their community.
Artist Statement: “Nothing happens by accident. I was meant to be taught by Ma‘iki Aiu Lake. And above all I know this to be truer than true…hula is life, every aspect of it, and we all can be made better for daring to dance.”
Bio: Award winning composer, arranger, singer, recording artist, director, choreographer, choral director, USA Ford Fellow of Music, and Hawaiian kumu hula, Robert Uluwehionāpuaikawekiuokalani Cazimero was born in Honolulu to parents Elizabeth Kapeka Meheula and William Kaʻaihue Cazimero, Sr., and was third youngest of a family of twelve children…only his sibling twins, Kanoe and Roland, were younger.
This sale is for a 100% rayon Hawaiian shirt from QuikSilver in size XL. There is one large pocket, 2” side vents, & coconut buttons. Armpit to armpit is 26 1/2” & the length is 31”. This shirt was made in U.S.A. & is in excellent condition.
Makaʻāinana were the equivalent of today’s citizens of Hawaiʻi. They made up the largest class of people in traditional society. Makaʻāinana lived in an ahupuaʻa (traditional land division) system. The ahupuaʻa were governed by managers or konohiki. The kuleana of the konohiki was to oversee the land, collect the taxes, and distribute community resources. The konohiki reported to the aliʻi. The konohiki and makaʻāinana were both governed by the aliʻi.
According to Perreira, “Coming together like this is extremely valuable. Classroom time is important, but this builds on that. This allows all of us to hear a broader range of thoughts and better shape our individual perspectives.”
Nā Ponohula workshop registrations REQUIRE purchase of KAHOH registration. You may purchase Nā Ponohula registration at the same time of KAHOH registration. If purchasing Nā Ponohula registration on behalf of others, ensure that they also have purchased KAHOH registration. Limited availability.
Katsu chicken only comes with 1 scoop of rice, that’s 10000% un-hawaiian. It has to be 2 scoops, come on, really? Ok cool kimchi, that’s a nice touch. A little young, but still good. The mac salad was barely recognizable. Almost tasted like they used brown rice pasta, it was that bland. A gang of olives which have no business being in my salad. It was almost “healthy”. A sad excuse. Easily the worse mac salad I’ve had at any Hawaiian food truck/restaurant.
He aha ka meaʻoi aku ma mua o ka ukuʻana i ka uku no nā haleʻaina kaulana? Uaʻike wau e pili ana i ka poʻe e kūʻai kālā ana ma ka pūnaewele akāʻaʻole au i manaʻo e hiki nō hoʻi iaʻu no kaʻu nohoʻana ma Asia. ʻO kahi maikaʻi koʻu ho’āʻoʻana i kāu ho’āʻo a kau inoaʻana, i kēia manawa, loaʻa iaʻu nā hana hebedoma mai nā hale likeʻole e makemake ana iaʻu e nānā i kā lākou mau mea kaulana! Ua lele au i Bangkok a me Singapore i nā uku a pau i ukuʻia no kahiʻahaʻainaʻai aʻu i uhi ai. ʻO kaʻu mea e’ōlelo aku nei he mahalo iāʻoe aʻoi aku ka mana iāʻoe!
Kūkulu hou ʻia ka heiau e Billy Fields.  Ma mua he heiau i hoʻomana ʻia no ka ulu kalo a me ka lako o ka ʻāina.  He kalo wale nō ka ʻāina ma mua a laila ka laiki, a laila ka poʻe hānai pipi.  I heiau ʻo Kūkaʻōʻō e kupu pono ai ka ʻāina.  He hoʻokupu.  Kupu ka ʻāina i ka wai…he ua, he wai kahe, he wai o ka ʻāina.
Ma hope o E hookupaa ana i ka hoʻomanawanui i ka mana kupaianaha ke ola, i ka Aha Kiekie ke kauoha i GcMAF a me’okikene kolu Inc lapaʻau e hoomau a piha ke ola a me ka kālā kākoʻo mai o kaʻIseraʻela Kuhina o Pale Kaua.
Our October/November issue is out! Inside you’ll find a visit to Hilo’s hundred-year-old Suisan Fish Market, a behind the scenes look at Hawai‘i State Archive’s collection of flags and standards from the days of the Hawaiian Monarchy, how particles falling onto Mauna Loa from space could provide answers about the origins of life on Earth and much, much more. As always we look forward to hearing your thoughts.
Walk a Mile in Her Shoes is a movement that started out small and has grown into a worldwide movement with men raising money for domestic violence shelters and sexual violence education, prevention and remediation programs.
Paulette Kahalepuna recently passed in 2014. This changed Mele’s life completely. With the loss of her mother, Mele was now left with an enormous task. The traditions of her ancestors were in her hands and what a great kuleana (responsibility) this is!
Since 1940, Hana Hou Restaurant has been offering tasty, homemade comfort food and desserts, with signature dishes that you won’t find anywhere else! Call us today for take-out or rent one of our motel rooms and enjoy our local diner. We welcome gluten-free and vegetarian guests!
I nā hopena pule, ua hele aku ‘o Leialoha i ka hale o kona kupuna wahine. He hoa noho maika‘i ko kona tūtū. Ua noho aku ke kāne lokomaika‘i i ka hale o ka ‘ao‘ao hema o ko kona tūtū hale. ‘O Kalei kona inoa. Ua makemake ‘o ia iā Leialoha no ka mea u‘i loa ‘o Leialoha.
Pierre Cardin. Material: 100% Rayon. Size: Men’s XL (See Measurements First to Assure Proper Fit). We want you to be happy. In addition, we recommend cleaning and ironing as needed. We are only human and may make a mistake once in a while.
Learn to make different styles of lei using native flora.  Participants will learn proper protocol for  picking plants for their lei. This huakaʻi may include a visit to various sites to gather plants Nā Ponohula participants will also learn an oli or hula to accompany the making of lei.
I call and get Aunty Paulette. I explained how/who gave me her name and what I was in the market for. Over the phone, she was very reserved and said very little other than to give me directions to her shop. So, my friend and I get there
I was first introduced to feather lei making when I used to dance hula for Na Lei Hulu I Ka Weiku.   When my kumu (dance teacher) asked us to make a lei hulu (feather lei) for a dance performance, I was super dissapointed because I knew it was going to be a LOT of work.  But WOW – that was perhaps one of the best things that I have ever done in my history of dancing hula.
Kūlana: Kihana nui, Kiʻi nui a me ka māmā kukui, Māmoku lua, E hoʻoukuhi i ka lima Kikokikona Kīpokā kaha Mākaukau kūpiki kaha Ka mea hiki ke kūpikipiki Ke kaha o ka mīkini ka ea Mokulele o ka mokulele Ka hoʻohanaʻana i ka hoʻonaʻauaoʻOihana kaumaha …
ke kuhi pneumatic, ke alakomo pinepine PSW-06 / 10 / 15, me ke kikowaena hana keleʻele, 6bar, 600L / min air air compressed PSW-21 ~ PSW-100, me ka’ōmole alloy alumini, 7bar, 800 L / min ke kōpili hau Kaha kiʻekiʻe a hāhā hou i ka pololei: ± 5% a me …
Ch.6 p.35 para.2 sent.2 Nānā akula ua wahi kanaka nei (ka mea i kapa ʻia he kuhina) i ka piʻo mai a ke ānuenue i uka o Paliuli, ʻōlelo akula ʻo ia i ke aliʻi, “ʻĒ! ʻAuhea ʻoe. when one of the men, the one who is called the counsellor, saw the rainbow arching over Paliuli. He said to the chief: “Look! Where are you!
I ka ‘ike ‘ana ‘o Ioane Kaahai i ka hō’ailona, a me ka mana’o o ka mea āna e li’a nei, lele a’ela ka hau’oli i loko ona, me he wai māpuna lā e hua’i ana, ani maila nō ho’i kona lima, me ke kūnou ‘ana mai o kona po’o, me ka mino’aka ka hau’oli e pā’ani ana i kona helehelena.
Jana B. said “I was planning a surprise 60th birthday party for my husband. We live in Murrieta, I work in Ventura during the week, and his birthday was Easter weekend. I didn’t know where to start. Thank goodness our…” read more
ʻO ka hana kumu o ko Ke Kulanui Kaiāulu ʻo Honolulu e hoʻoholo i ka hoʻonaʻuaao ʻana i nā haumāna like ʻole āpau ma nā hana aʻo pono he nui, me nā hana e holomua ai i nā mea kumu manaʻo pono, ka paipai ʻana i ka hoʻoulu pono i nā haumāna āpau, me ke kuleana e lawelawe i nā haumāna ʻōiwi Hawaiʻi a e lawelawe i kānaka o ke kaiāulu e huli ana i ke ola ame ka naʻauao no ka pono o nā lāhui kānaka a puni ka honua, ma nā papa hana hana noʻeau, ke kākoʻo ʻana i nā haumāna e makemake ai e hele i ke kulanui ame nā papa hana ʻoihana pākōlea like ʻole.
Nui nā heiau i kūkulu ‘ia e nā kūpuna ma Mānoa. Ma mua, aia lā ma kahi o ‘umikūmāhā heiau. Eia na‘e, ho‘okahi wale nō heiau i koe, ‘o Kūka‘ō‘ō kona inoa, a ke kū mau nei ma ka ‘āina i lilo i ka ‘ohana Cooke. E lohe ana ʻoukou i kekahi moʻolelo no Kūkaʻōʻō i kēia lā a e ʻikemaka ana ʻoukou i ka heiau e kū mau nei.
to find at least 8 people sittlng around a work table making/learning how to make feather leis. Evidently, it’s not a matter of stringing these feathers together but it is an “art”. The 8 or so learning this art are future judges for the upcoming Ms Hawaii pageant and were there to learn “some” Hawaiian culture…. I got to meet another hula kumu who’s name was Lanakila… Go figure. Talented man who is also a teacher at Mid Pacific Institute. He was taught hula by Kumu Robert Cazimero I am told. Both talented men. I am impressed.
Author Mahealani Uchiyama trained in Hawaii in the hula lineage of Joseph Kamoha’i Kaha’ulelio and is currently the Kumu Hula at the Halau Ku Ua Tuahine in Berkeley, California. As the founder and artistic director of the Center for International Dance and board member of Dance Arts West, the producers of San Francisco’s annual Ethnic Dance Festival, Uchiyama’s approach to hula is deeply holistic and reflects her background in indigenous wisdom traditions and cultural exchange and interaction.
Moses is also the founder and artistic director of ʻInamona Theatre Company, an organization dedicated to reintroducing the native stories of Hawaiʻi to the community. ʻInamona is a traditional Hawaiian relish made from the roasted kernel of the kukui (candlenut). It is sprinkled sparingly over mea ʻai (nourishing food) to gently enhance the natural flavor. Moses believes that no matter how skilled the storyteller, his (or her) work is merely a condiment to the greater sustenance. The true “mea ʻai” are the stories that have come before us, the stories of our ancestors.
Lashio (Burmese: လားရှိုးမြို့; MLCTS: la: hrui: mrui., IPA: [láʃó mjo̰]; Shan: လႃႈသဵဝ်ႈ) is the largest town in northern Shan State, Myanmar, about 200 kilometres (120 mi) north-east of Mandalay. It is situated on a low mountain spur overlooking the valley of the Yaw River.[1] Loi Leng, the highest mountain of the Shan Hills, is located 45 km (28 mi) to the south-east of Lashio.[2]
60 -year kahiko kane me ka prostate Ka maʻi ‘aʻai, Gleason nāʻai 8 diagnosed ma February 2011. He loaa’ano’ē prostatectomy me ka hōmona Inc akā, ma hope oʻoki kino, a mahuahua nui hou ma ka PSA. He loaa pāhawewe Inc, 60 Hinahina i ka pelvic māhele ‘āina. Ma May 2012, a hoike aku la oia ia ia iho ma Saisei Mirai. He loaa 72 manawa 0.5 ml kiʻekiʻe-mahele lāʻau GcMAF (1500 ng / ml 0.5), kiʻekiʻe-mahele lāʻau IV wikamina C a me 60g 21 manawa o nā ‘āina hyperthermia ka hoʻohana’ ana Thermotron RF8.
Therefore, when I hear the phrase Nānā i ke kumu, I know I must consider my emotional sense of place as well as my intellectual honesty and reasoning. In this regard, I am no different from most within our Hawai‘i communities, whether they be keiki o ka ‘āina, kama‘āina, or malihini. Each person has a connection to this place; all have deliberately chosen to be here.
O ka lua o ka po ili ai, o Mahealani ia, ina i hiki mai ka mahina ma hope o ka pouli ana, o Kulu[a] ia o ka lua o ka po i hiki pouli mai ai ka mahina ma ka hikina o ka mokupuni, o Laaukukahi ia, oia no ka po e pau ai ka poepoe o ka mahina, a oioi hou, a oia hoi ka po, e hoomaka ai ka uukuhou ana o ka mahina.